PennStateHoops.com Discussion Forum

Video blog from the Illinois road trip


#1

http://www.gopsusports.com/blog/2011/02/feature-48-winter-hours-with-penn-state-mens-hoops.html


#2

Interesting that Brooks was set on playing in the 2nd half


#3

Not that surprising, the kid is becoming quite a leader on this team.


#4

Did anyone else notice Talor seemed to be grimacing and maybe favoring his left leg a bit as he got off the bus and walked to the arena around the 3:00 mark of the video? It’s probably nothing…


#5

I like Brooks, but I have to question his “leadership”. He’s turned into a really good player, but I don’t know if I could play along side someone like him.

There’s the type of people who can encourage you, motivate you, and get you to do outstanding things, then there’s the type who can jump down your throat each time you do someting wrong. I’ve seen Brooks do the latter a couple times.

For example… There was a play when Oliver had the ball under his basket with 3 Illinois defenders around him. He looked indecisive, did a little pump fake or two, then passed the ball back to Brooks in the middle of the lane. …called for a 3 second violation I believe…

On the trip down the floor, Brooks approached him with his arms extended out from his sides and really laying into him. As a leader, I don’t think that was a good way to handle that situation.


#6

that was Cornley’s biggest problem his JR year. He toned it down considerably his SR year and it made a big difference.


#7
[quote="jjepsu92, post:3, topic:1897"]Not that surprising, the kid is becoming quite a leader on this team.[/quote]

I like Brooks, but I have to question his “leadership”. He’s turned into a really good player, but I don’t know if I could play along side someone like him.

There’s the type of people who can encourage you, motivate you, and get you to do outstanding things, then there’s the type who can jump down your throat each time you do someting wrong. I’ve seen Brooks do the latter a couple times.

For example… There was a play when Oliver had the ball under his basket with 3 Illinois defenders around him. He looked indecisive, did a little pump fake or two, then passed the ball back to Brooks in the middle of the lane. …called for a 3 second violation I believe…

On the trip down the floor, Brooks approached him with his arms extended out from his sides and really laying into him. As a leader, I don’t think that was a good way to handle that situation.

Honestly, it depends on what he was saying. He might have been laying into him telling him that he needs to shoot in that situation. Sometimes laying into a guy is to send him the message that he’s good enough to do something that he hesitated on. i.e. You don’t yell at him for failing at something he can’t do. You yell at him for not doing something that he can do.

And btw that 3 second call was total BS. He was only in the lane for 2 seconds when the whistle blew. I replayed that on my DVR to count it and posted in the game thread at the time that the whistle was WAY too quick. He drove into the lane from the wing so it wasn’t like he was camped in there.


#8

Hightower blew his whistle because the play looked wierd, so he assumed something must be wrong… and 3 seconds was the easiest bail-out. Actually Billy hesitated for so long that I bet that’s who Hightower was looking at when he made the call, but you can’t get a 3 second violation if you have possession, can you?


#9
[quote="JakkL, post:7, topic:1897"]And btw that 3 second call was total BS. He was only in the lane for 2 seconds when the whistle blew. I replayed that on my DVR to count it and posted in the game thread at the time that the whistle was WAY too quick. He drove into the lane from the wing so it wasn't like he was camped in there.[/quote] Hightower blew his whistle because the play looked wierd, so he assumed something must be wrong... and 3 seconds was the easiest bail-out. Actually Billy hesitated for so long that I bet that's who Hightower was looking at when he made the call, but you can't get a 3 second violation if you have possession, can you?

I thought exactly the same thing. I swear Oliver had the ball when the whistle blew.


#10

The whistle blew as soon as he passed it to Jeff. But Hightower never gave Billy the opportunity to get out of the lane. Brooks shot the ball almost immediately. So it really was an unfair call.

A few minutes later Mike Davis was dancing in the lane for five seconds before receiving the ball for an easy deuce, no call (different ref though).

Problem was, the play focused on Billy for what seemed like a very long time in the lane. But even after passing it up, a ref should give the player at least a split second to make a move out of the lane. Instantly, on the pass, the whistle blew.

There’s a reason why every fan base in America cringes when they see Ed Hightower at their team’s game.


#11
[quote="JakkL, post:7, topic:1897"]And btw that 3 second call was total BS. He was only in the lane for 2 seconds when the whistle blew. I replayed that on my DVR to count it and posted in the game thread at the time that the whistle was WAY too quick. He drove into the lane from the wing so it wasn't like he was camped in there.[/quote] [b]Hightower blew his whistle because the play looked wierd, so he assumed something must be wrong... and 3 seconds was the easiest bail-out.[/b] Actually Billy hesitated for so long that I bet that's who Hightower was looking at when he made the call, but you can't get a 3 second violation if you have possession, can you?

To beat a dead horse, this is my problem with the “out of Frazier” call at the end of the Purdue game. Refs make calls on what they THINK happened, not on some type of micro-inspected scenerio.

Perhaps the 3 second call was made on Brooks.


#12
[quote="JakkL, post:7, topic:1897"]And btw that 3 second call was total BS. He was only in the lane for 2 seconds when the whistle blew. I replayed that on my DVR to count it and posted in the game thread at the time that the whistle was WAY too quick. He drove into the lane from the wing so it wasn't like he was camped in there.[/quote] [b]Hightower blew his whistle because the play looked wierd, so he assumed something must be wrong... and 3 seconds was the easiest bail-out.[/b] Actually Billy hesitated for so long that I bet that's who Hightower was looking at when he made the call, but you can't get a 3 second violation if you have possession, can you?

To beat a dead horse, this is my problem with the “out of Frazier” call at the end of the Purdue game. Refs make calls on what they THINK happened, not on some type of micro-inspected scenerio.

Perhaps the 3 second call was made on Brooks.

The turnover was credited to Brooks but it shouldn’t have been, he came into the lane after Oliver did. The call was on Oliver but he wasn’t in the lane for three seconds. BTW - Hightower may have blown the call by counting too fast but he did blow the whistle at the right time, i.e. when Oliver passed the ball. You are allowed to have the ball in the lane for three seconds as long as you are dribbling or shoot the ball. But if you pass it after being in the lane for three seconds, that’s when it’s a foul. The referee isn’t supposed to give the player time to get out of the lane after making a pass like NittanyIllini wanted him too.


#13
[quote="JakkL, post:7, topic:1897"]And btw that 3 second call was total BS. He was only in the lane for 2 seconds when the whistle blew. I replayed that on my DVR to count it and posted in the game thread at the time that the whistle was WAY too quick. He drove into the lane from the wing so it wasn't like he was camped in there.[/quote] [b]Hightower blew his whistle because the play looked wierd, so he assumed something must be wrong... and 3 seconds was the easiest bail-out.[/b] Actually Billy hesitated for so long that I bet that's who Hightower was looking at when he made the call, but you can't get a 3 second violation if you have possession, can you?

To beat a dead horse, this is my problem with the “out of Frazier” call at the end of the Purdue game. Refs make calls on what they THINK happened, not on some type of micro-inspected scenerio.

Perhaps the 3 second call was made on Brooks.

The turnover was credited to Brooks but it shouldn’t have been, he came into the lane after Oliver did. The call was on Oliver but he wasn’t in the lane for three seconds. BTW - Hightower may have blown the call by counting too fast but he did blow the whistle at the right time, i.e. when Oliver passed the ball. You are allowed to have the ball in the lane for three seconds as long as you are dribbling or shoot the ball. But if you pass it after being in the lane for three seconds, that’s when it’s a foul. The referee isn’t supposed to give the player time to get out of the lane after making a pass like NittanyIllini wanted him too.

Thanks for the clarification Lar. But let me ask you this then…If Jared Sullinger or JuJuan Johnson post up in the lane and get the ball, three seconds later after the defense collapses, they pass out for an uncontested three as they scamper out of the lane. Normally you don’t see a whistle blown in that case, though you should. Shoot it or the whistle will blow is what you’re saying in the Oliver case…when all he was doing was making a smart pass to an open man after three guys collapsed on him in the lane. What if Oliver threw an alley-oop toward the hoop, would they have blown the whistle then? Probably not, though it is a pass, same as what he threw Brooks’ way.

I’m not arguing the call as much as trying to get a clarification of what is a player’s options when the defense collapses like they did and the only play is to pass out of the jam. In that case, give the passer a chance to make a move out of the lane, then blow the whistle if he does not. Hightower never gave Oliver that option.


#14

[quote=“NittanyIllini, post:13, topic:1897”]Thanks for the clarification Lar. But let me ask you this then…If Jared Sullinger or JuJuan Johnson post up in the lane and get the ball, three seconds later after the defense collapses, they pass out for an uncontested three as they scamper out of the lane. Normally you don’t see a whistle blown in that case, though you should. Shoot it or the whistle will blow is what you’re saying in the Oliver case…when all he was doing was making a smart pass to an open man after three guys collapsed on him in the lane. What if Oliver threw an alley-oop toward the hoop, would they have blown the whistle then? Probably not, though it is a pass, same as what he threw Brooks’ way.

I’m not arguing the call as much as trying to get a clarification of what is a player’s options when the defense collapses like they did and the only play is to pass out of the jam. In that case, give the passer a chance to make a move out of the lane, then blow the whistle if he does not. Hightower never gave Oliver that option.[/quote]

Here’s the rule:

[i]Section 9. Three-Second Rule

Art. 1. A player shall not be permitted to have any part of his or her body remain in the three-second lane for more than three consecutive seconds while the ball is in control of that player’s team in his or her front court.
a. A team in control of the ball for a throw-in adjacent to a front-court boundary line may not be called for a three-second violation.

Art. 2. Allowance shall be made for a player who, having been in the three second lane for less than three seconds, dribbles or moves in immediately to try for field goal.
a. The player shall not pass the ball instead of trying for goal.
[/i]

Once you go beyond that three second count, your only option is to shoot the ball, not pass it. It doesn’t say that you can pass the ball if you immediately haul ass out of the lane.