PennStateHoops.com Discussion Forum

Trivia: do not google!

Here’s a fun trivia question.

Please, no googling. This is done on the honor system.

The question:

Who was the shortest player to record both 2,00 points and 1,000 rebounds in his college career?

Wild guess, spud webb or Calvin Murphy. Go with the spud

Neither

I’ll go with Tiny Archibald.

[quote=“Skeeza, post:1, topic:1574”]Here’s a fun trivia question.

Please, no googling. This is done on the honor system.

The question:

Who was the shortest player to record both 2,00 points and 1,000 rebounds in his college career?[/quote]

1000 rebounds might be harder to get than 2000 points. I think the others are attacking it from the wrong direction, naming great short scorers and thinking they might get lucky and grab 1000 rebounds. The only guy in Penn State history to grab 1000 boards was Jesse Arnelle. Talor despite being a good rebounder isn’t even going to come close winding up with somewhere around 600. So whoever the guy is will have to also be considered a great rebounder overall not just for his size, someone like Oscar Robertson. Oscar would be the obvious choice but he’s undoubtedly not the answer because it would be too easy. Perhaps it’s a trick question and the answer is Charles Barkley, the round mound of rebound. Barkley was listed at 6’6" but was actually 6’4" so he’s shorter than Robertson, who was 6’5".

I’ll guess Sidney Moncrief – I know he did it but he was like 6-4 so I’m probably wrong.

1,000 rebounds is a lot of rebounds. It averages out to about 8 per game over a four year career. So I’ll go with a fairly short, yet physical forward - Charles Barkley.

Barkley - nope
Moncrief - nope
Oscar - nope
Archibald - nope

Hoops fans have heard this name, no doubt.

[quote=“Skeeza, post:8, topic:1574”]Barkley - nope
Moncrief - nope
Oscar - nope
Archibald - nope

Hoops fans have heard this name, no doubt.[/quote]

Calvin Murphy (although not sure if he has already been eliminated).

David Rivers?

First guess–I’ll go Oscar Robertson. He’s the obvious answer so he’s obviously not the answer which makes him a not so obvious answer so he’s my first answer. My head hurts.

Wild card guess? Paul Millsap. Probably way too tall though.

Pistol Pete? Know he had the points. Not sure of his height. He only had three years to do it.

Trying to think of good, undersized all around players who were most likely 6’5" or under, that haven’t been mentioned and the only name that I can come up with is Havlicek. Based mostly from my Uncle’s praise of his NBA career. I’m guessing that I’m way off because Lucas was probably the more dominant player when Hondo was at OSU, and I think they played during the era when Frosh did not play. DOes anyone know how tall he was?

Wouldn’t have been close. In three years he would have played 85 games or so. That means he’d have had to average about a dozen rebounds a game, which is absurd.

We’ll Lar mentioned that Jesse Arnelle had 1000 boards, I know he had 2000 points. He was “only” 6’5" -why not go with him.

John Wooden? I remember on one of the tributes on TV that he was a 3 time All-American or whatever it was called back then. Perhaps his later career overshadowed his playing days?

Here’s a question, were rebounds a stat back in the 1920s & 1930s? Shoot, was it even a word?

[quote="Skeeza, post:8, topic:1574"]Hoops fans have heard this name, no doubt.[/quote]

Trying to think of good, undersized all around players who were most likely 6’5" or under, that haven’t been mentioned and the only name that I can come up with is Havlicek. Based mostly from my Uncle’s praise of his NBA career. I’m guessing that I’m way off because Lucas was probably the more dominant player when Hondo was at OSU, and I think they played during the era when Frosh did not play. DOes anyone know how tall he was?

Too tall. He also suffered from the three year problem (plus they played fewer games) and the fact that there were so many good players on the Ohio State teams (Lucas, Siegried, and Havlichek) that I doubt that anyone could have racked up enough points or rebounds.

I’ll go with Jungle Jim Luscotoff, Bailey Howell and Wayne Embry. And how about David Thompson?

I’m guessing that the number of games played per year would have been trimmed during the Great Depression. Probably eliminates Wooden. I’m dying to look up when rebounds became a stat.

[quote=“manatree, post:16, topic:1574”]John Wooden? I remember on one of the tributes on TV that he was a 3 time All-American or whatever it was called back then. Perhaps his later career overshadowed his playing days?

Here’s a question, were rebounds a stat back in the 1920s & 1930s? Shoot, was it even a word?[/quote]

Not Wooden for several reasons. One, I’m pretty sure rebounds didn’t become a stat until around WWII. Two, Wooden probably only played three years. Typically, in those days freshman couldn’t play (however, freshman were often eligible during war years which is why that Jesse Arnelle played four years at PSU). Third, he wouldn’t have played enough games. He probably only averaged 20 games a year when he played, so his career probably consisted of about 60 games. Just not enough games to get either 2000 pts or 1000 rebounds (even if they counted them).