Ten Facts you probably didn't know about the Sweet Sixteen teams


#1
  1. The tournament is on track to be the most unpredictable one in the modern era (defined as when they went to 64 teams 24 years ago). The lower seeded team has won 19.6% of the games and the record for a tournament is in 1986 when lower seeds won 18.8%.

  2. Somewhat related, the tournament has been upset city to date (defined as when a team beats one that’s four or more seeds higher). The average number of upsets in a tournament is 8.3. There have been 9 in this tournament already with seven more chances (out of eight) for an upset in the next round. The record for most total upsets is 13 - set in 1985, 1986, 1999, and 2002.

  3. Also related, there’s only one game in the next round that will be played according to expected seed, i.e. the next round should be #1 vs #4 and #2 vs #3 but the only game that fits is #1 Duke vs #4 Purdue (also the only game that doesn’t meet the previous criteria for a possible upset).

  4. There’s only one region where three of the four top seeds made it - the South with #1 Duke, #3 Baylor, and #4 Purdue.

  5. They have the “oldest” starting lineup of the modern era. They average 3.20 years (FR=1, SO=2, JR=3, SR=4). Second “oldest” was in 1997.

  6. Their coaches are the second least experienced of the modern era (and maybe the reason my model failed so miserably). They average 6.02 trips to the tournament. The least experienced was in 1986.

  7. A possibly related fact, their coaches have only made an average of 1.14 trips to the Elite Eight, the second lowest ever. Lowest was 1999 at 1.13.

  8. They tied for the hottest teams ever, averaging 7.47 wins in their last ten games (tied with 2008).

  9. They have the second highest season long winning percentage ever at .821. Highest was 2008 at .823.

  10. Defense rules. They average giving up only 64.1 ppg, third lowest ever behind 2008’s 62.9.

11 (in honor of our conference). Lack of offense doesn’t matter. They score only 75.5 ppg, fourth lowest ever behind 1985’s 74.5


#2

Pt #3 is interesting… Of all the seedings, Duke and Purdue were two of the teams widely regarded as “most likely to exit early” yet they both made it through this far.


#3

Interesting. Thanks.


#4

Absolutely, quite interesting. Thanks for sharing Lar.

Speaking on point #5, I am so looking forward to Cornell, who starts a team of 21/22 year old Ivy League scholars, vs Kentucky’s 18/19 year old “Calipari scholars”. It might be the most intriguing game of the entire tournament, especially now that Kansas is but dust in the wind. :wink:


#5

Lar, #5 through the end begin to use a generic “they” at the beginning.

At first, you would assume that the meaning of “they” is the 16 teams in the Sweet 16. But, #5 uses “they” while going on to define the starters as 10 players, or 5 starters from each team, meaning “they” does not refere to ALL the Sweet 16 teams, only 2 teams of the 16. It throws the “they” into question for the remaining.

Actually, after reading #11, I think “they” refers only to Ohio State and Purdue.


#6

[quote=“Skeeza, post:5, topic:1030”]Lar, #5 through the end begin to use a generic “they” at the beginning.

At first, you would assume that the meaning of “they” is the 16 teams in the Sweet 16. But, #5 uses “they” while going on to define the starters as 10 players, or 5 starters from each team, meaning “they” does not refere to ALL the Sweet 16 teams, only 2 teams of the 16. It throws the “they” into question for the remaining.

Actually, after reading #11, I think “they” refers only to Ohio State and Purdue.[/quote]

This is an ordered list underneath the title “Ten Facts you probably didn’t know about the Sweet Sixteen Teams”. Because it’s a list, the pronoun “they” at the start of every sentence refers back to the noun “teams” in the title not to the nouns in the immediate sentence before it.

The parenthetical list in #5 isn’t a list of ten players, it’s how the years are calculated to come up with average, i.e. freshman year counts as one year, sophomore year counts as two, etc.

The “in honor of our conference” parenthetical expression in point 11 was a joke directed at the Big Ten because the list of “ten facts” has eleven items in it.


#7
[quote="Skeeza, post:5, topic:1030"]Lar, #5 through the end begin to use a generic "they" at the beginning.

At first, you would assume that the meaning of “they” is the 16 teams in the Sweet 16. But, #5 uses “they” while going on to define the starters as 10 players, or 5 starters from each team, meaning “they” does not refere to ALL the Sweet 16 teams, only 2 teams of the 16. It throws the “they” into question for the remaining.

Actually, after reading #11, I think “they” refers only to Ohio State and Purdue.[/quote]

This is an ordered list underneath the title “Ten Facts you probably didn’t know about the Sweet Sixteen Teams”. Because it’s a list, the pronoun “they” at the start of every sentence refers back to the noun “teams” in the title not to the nouns in the immediate sentence before it.

The parenthetical list in #5 isn’t a list of ten players, it’s how the years are calculated to come up with average, i.e. freshman year counts as one year, sophomore year counts as two, etc.
The “in honor of our conference” parenthetical expression in point 11 was a joke directed at the Big Ten because the list of “ten facts” has eleven items in it.

…if that were the case, why are they listing 10 players as a “starting line-up”. There are only 5 starters on a team.


#8
[quote="Skeeza, post:5, topic:1030"]Lar, #5 through the end begin to use a generic "they" at the beginning.

At first, you would assume that the meaning of “they” is the 16 teams in the Sweet 16. But, #5 uses “they” while going on to define the starters as 10 players, or 5 starters from each team, meaning “they” does not refere to ALL the Sweet 16 teams, only 2 teams of the 16. It throws the “they” into question for the remaining.

Actually, after reading #11, I think “they” refers only to Ohio State and Purdue.[/quote]

This is an ordered list underneath the title “Ten Facts you probably didn’t know about the Sweet Sixteen Teams”. Because it’s a list, the pronoun “they” at the start of every sentence refers back to the noun “teams” in the title not to the nouns in the immediate sentence before it.

The parenthetical list in #5 isn’t a list of ten players, it’s how the years are calculated to come up with average, i.e. freshman year counts as one year, sophomore year counts as two, etc.
The “in honor of our conference” parenthetical expression in point 11 was a joke directed at the Big Ten because the list of “ten facts” has eleven items in it.

…if that were the case, why are they listing 10 players as a “starting line-up”. There are only 5 starters on a team.

I guess I really am going to have to spell everything out.

Here’s the sentence that is confusing you:

“They average 3.20 years (FR=1, SO=2, JR=3, SR=4).”

The spelled out version of the sentence would read something like this:

“The teams in the Sweet Sixteen average 3.20 years of experience when you count a freshman as having one year of experience, a sophomore as two years of experience, a junior as three years of experience, and a senior as four years of experience.”


#9
[quote="Skeeza, post:5, topic:1030"]Lar, #5 through the end begin to use a generic "they" at the beginning.

At first, you would assume that the meaning of “they” is the 16 teams in the Sweet 16. But, #5 uses “they” while going on to define the starters as 10 players, or 5 starters from each team, meaning “they” does not refere to ALL the Sweet 16 teams, only 2 teams of the 16. It throws the “they” into question for the remaining.

Actually, after reading #11, I think “they” refers only to Ohio State and Purdue.[/quote]

This is an ordered list underneath the title “Ten Facts you probably didn’t know about the Sweet Sixteen Teams”. Because it’s a list, the pronoun “they” at the start of every sentence refers back to the noun “teams” in the title not to the nouns in the immediate sentence before it.

The parenthetical list in #5 isn’t a list of ten players, it’s how the years are calculated to come up with average, i.e. freshman year counts as one year, sophomore year counts as two, etc.
The “in honor of our conference” parenthetical expression in point 11 was a joke directed at the Big Ten because the list of “ten facts” has eleven items in it.

…if that were the case, why are they listing 10 players as a “starting line-up”. There are only 5 starters on a team.

I guess I really am going to have to spell everything out.

Here’s the sentence that is confusing you:

“They average 3.20 years (FR=1, SO=2, JR=3, SR=4).”

The spelled out version of the sentence would read something like this:

“The teams in the Sweet Sixteen average 3.20 years of experience when you count a freshman as having one year of experience, a sophomore as two years of experience, a junior as three years of experience, and a senior as four years of experience.”

OK, I understand. I thought they were saying something different. I thought the numbers were a COUNT of the players, not the number of years for each (because of it being a bit obvious).

Here’s another point I have to make…

That 3.2 seems to be way too high. A value that high doesnt seem possible with the number of freshmen that are playing. As an example:

If a team started a single freshman, they would need to have all 4 other starts being seniors to hit near that value (1+4+4+4+4 = 17 / 5 = 3.4). Considering a team like Kentucky with 3 freshman, a soph and a junior. That team alone would blow the average (1.6). It would take 2 teams playing an entire lineup of 5 seniors to pull that average up to 3.2 (1.6 + 4.0 +4.0 = 9.6 / 3 = 3.2).

Tomorrow’s first game is
Syracuse
Wes Johnson, F (jr)
Rick Jackson, F (jr)
Kris Joseph, F (so)
Andy Rautins, G (sr)
Brandon Triche, G (fr)
total 13 / 5 = 2.6

…vs…

Butler
Willie Veasley, F (sr)
Matt Howard, F (jr)
Shelvin Mack, G (so)
Ronald Nored, G (so)
Gordon Hayward, G-F (so)
total 13 / 5 = 2.6

That number seems WAY too high. Don’t know where he got it, but it sounds like bad info. I’d almost be willing to bet that if you manually did the math on this point, that number wouldn’t even be above 3.0 !!!


#10
[quote="Skeeza, post:5, topic:1030"]Lar, #5 through the end begin to use a generic "they" at the beginning.

At first, you would assume that the meaning of “they” is the 16 teams in the Sweet 16. But, #5 uses “they” while going on to define the starters as 10 players, or 5 starters from each team, meaning “they” does not refere to ALL the Sweet 16 teams, only 2 teams of the 16. It throws the “they” into question for the remaining.

Actually, after reading #11, I think “they” refers only to Ohio State and Purdue.[/quote]

This is an ordered list underneath the title “Ten Facts you probably didn’t know about the Sweet Sixteen Teams”. Because it’s a list, the pronoun “they” at the start of every sentence refers back to the noun “teams” in the title not to the nouns in the immediate sentence before it.

The parenthetical list in #5 isn’t a list of ten players, it’s how the years are calculated to come up with average, i.e. freshman year counts as one year, sophomore year counts as two, etc.
The “in honor of our conference” parenthetical expression in point 11 was a joke directed at the Big Ten because the list of “ten facts” has eleven items in it.

…if that were the case, why are they listing 10 players as a “starting line-up”. There are only 5 starters on a team.

I guess I really am going to have to spell everything out.

Here’s the sentence that is confusing you:

“They average 3.20 years (FR=1, SO=2, JR=3, SR=4).”

The spelled out version of the sentence would read something like this:

“The teams in the Sweet Sixteen average 3.20 years of experience when you count a freshman as having one year of experience, a sophomore as two years of experience, a junior as three years of experience, and a senior as four years of experience.”

OK, I understand. I thought they were saying something different. I thought the numbers were a COUNT of the players, not the number of years for each (because of it being a bit obvious).

Here’s another point I have to make…

That 3.2 seems to be way too high. A value that high doesnt seem possible with the number of freshmen that are playing. As an example:

If a team started a single freshman, they would need to have all 4 other starts being seniors to hit near that value (1+4+4+4+4 = 17 / 5 = 3.4). Considering a team like Kentucky with 3 freshman, a soph and a junior. That team alone would blow the average (1.6). It would take 2 teams playing an entire lineup of 5 seniors to pull that average up to 3.2 (1.6 + 4.0 +4.0 = 9.6 / 3 = 3.2).

Tomorrow’s first game is
Syracuse
Wes Johnson, F (jr)
Rick Jackson, F (jr)
Kris Joseph, F (so)
Andy Rautins, G (sr)
Brandon Triche, G (fr)
total 13 / 5 = 2.6

…vs…

Butler
Willie Veasley, F (sr)
Matt Howard, F (jr)
Shelvin Mack, G (so)
Ronald Nored, G (so)
Gordon Hayward, G-F (so)
total 13 / 5 = 2.6

That number seems WAY too high. Don’t know where he got it, but it sounds like bad info. I’d almost be willing to bet that if you manually did the math on this point, that number wouldn’t even be above 3.0 !!!

Are RS years factored in at all? That could help bump up the numbers. I agree that 3.2 just seems high. But I don’t have time to look at all 16 rosters.