PennStateHoops.com Discussion Forum

Recruiting for prep programs


#1

Yikes

The courtship of junior high players by private schools has become so cutthroat that it has spawned tales of coaches’ throwing one another out of gyms, traveling across the country to recruit middle school prospects and ingratiating themselves with local travel teams, independent teams made up of higher-level players, in an attempt to gain better access to players.

#2

Double yikes!!!

I always “follow the money.” I assume the hoop players are getting free tuition. Sometimes room and board also.
WHY??? I don’t see the hoop teams being money makers.
Where does the money come from?
Could colleges or college boosters be involved??


#3

[quote=“tundra, post:2, topic:3328”]Double yikes!!!

I always “follow the money.” I assume the hoop players are getting free tuition. Sometimes room and board also.
WHY??? I don’t see the hoop teams being money makers.
Where does the money come from?
Could colleges or college boosters be involved?? [/quote]

Money comes from hangers-on, people like us who are attached to their teams, but with money. Self-esteem, prestige, etc., and you buy in a closeness to it.

Prep schools get unbelievable amount of publicity. Years ago, someone tried to calculate what it would cost a major college to advertise to get the kind of ink and attention that a sports program gets and it was astounding.


#4
[quote="tundra, post:2, topic:3328"]Double yikes!!!!!!!!!

I always “follow the money.” I assume the hoop players are getting free tuition. Sometimes room and board also.
WHY??? I don’t see the hoop teams being money makers.
Where does the money come from?
Could colleges or college boosters be involved??[/quote]

Money comes from hangers-on, people like us who are attached to their teams, but with money. Self-esteem, prestige, etc., and you buy in a closeness to it.

Prep schools get unbelievable amount of publicity. Years ago, someone tried to calculate what it would cost a major college to advertise to get the kind of ink and attention that a sports program gets and it was astounding.

Sometimes, it’s nothing but prestige:
Some people want to play the Power Broker, and be a big man in a littel pond. It happened here in Harrisburg, where you have an Ath Dir at Harrisburg High named Kirk Smallwood. He wanted to create his sports empire, so he starts spending big bucks. He spends a half million on a new football field, pays a high schol football coach (Chaump) over $100K per year to coach the team, has a hoops team with 5 sets of jerseys, etc. School teachers didn’t have enough for text books. Maybe not a lot of money to be made, but they are spending other people’s money, so it’s no big deal to them.

Sometimes it’s about the MONEY:
York City Schools are now sending students to Academies, such as New Hope Academy. Money comes from the school district to pay for these enrollments. These academies are private school. There are poeple who make a LOT of money by having kids transfered to these school. As tjb says, a good sports team is great advertising. I know a lot of kids who chose Penn State because of the football team. There are people like Isiah Anderson, the former York High Head Basketball coach, who opened the school and are getting a huge finacial windfall from having students attend. Anderson had gotten in trouble before when he opened a similar school in Crispus Attucks in York, and was recruiting kids from neighboring states to play hoops. He not only is getting his empire, he is getting PAID (by the taxpayer)!!!

Kinda strange how a school district can eliminate sports while the district-sponored academies can keep on playing, isn’t it?


#5

I don’t know about the academies, but it is always a mistake to compare prestigious private schools with public.

Without having to pay for special education, special needs kids, kids with discipline problems, or even transportation, and while paying less than market rates for teachers, the local private school at the top of the heap, Waynflete, spent more than $25,000 per student in 2010.

According to the Census Department’s recent report on education spending, Maine was paying $12,259 per student for public education. Generally, I believe that is the contribution public schools make when for whatever reason a kid is sent to a private institution, but I don’t know if that is always the case.

It’s possible the private schools take the public school kid and associated contribution, and make up the rest in scholarship dollars. I know that Waynflete spends an extra couple of grand per kid than the 24K in tuition each paid, made up from a handful of wealthy alumni who contribute a chunk annually to keep costs down.


#6

I think rules would vary by state but I don’t think ALL private schools are reinbused by the state. In PA, I believe only authorized “charter” schools get state reimbursement.
I’m guessing many private academies/preps and Catholic are not "charter.'
Maybe someone more knowledgeable can help out.

There is some info in this linked article, but the article may not be 100% on point.
http://www.psba.org/issues-advocacy/issues-research/research-resource-center/psba-charterschool-white-paper-oct2010.pdf

Bottom line, I am still very unsure of the “money” funding and motives for these prep basketball powerhouses.


#7

I think it’s rare, and I don’t know what I am talking about generally or specifically in Pennsylvania’s case. I just have heard over the years about special circumstances in which a kid ends up in a private school and the public picks up some of the tab. As school vouchers are not legal yet, it has to be a fairly rare occurrence.

My point was just to show the difference in per pupil funding between expensive private schools and public schools - and that’s with the privates not having to deal with any of the very expensive problems that publics face. Off topic.


#8
[quote="tundra, post:6, topic:3328"]I think rules would vary by state but I don't think ALL private schools are reimbursed by the state.[/quote]

I think it’s rare, and I don’t know what I am talking about generally or specifically in Pennsylvania’s case. I just have heard over the years about special circumstances in which a kid ends up in a private school and the public picks up some of the tab. As school vouchers are not legal yet, it has to be a fairly rare occurrence.

My point was just to show the difference in per pupil funding between expensive private schools and public schools - and that’s with the privates not having to deal with any of the very expensive problems that publics face. Off topic.


OK tjb. I see your point (highlighted) and agree with it.