OT - The existential PennStateHoops.com dilemma


#1

Positive or critical?

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/31/fashion/31positive.html?adxnnl=1&src=sch&pagewanted=all&adxnnlx=1262268082-EO/nWwoIoQbpuC5v0TM+Yg

To be clear, my desire for positivity is not an approach to improving things. It’s more like the findings from Dr. David Spiegel in the article: To make our suffering easier to bear. :wink:


#2

You know, the lady who suggests that positive thinking undermines productivity seems “out there” to me. In fact, I could only imagine that there is no credible research to validate such a theory. I manage a sales floor at a Chevrolet dealership. I can tell you that the negative attitudes of a slow market serve no useful purpose. But when I, the ever optimist, can persuade them to think positively, the results are alarmingly better. That woman, in my opinion, is missing the forest for the trees.


#3

I just read through the article very quickly, but it appeared to me there was some link that being happy and having a positive outlook are the same thing. That has definitely been a problem on the board in the past. I think a positive outlook and mood are necessary, but you can still have a positive outlook/approach and be “unhappy” or maybe “less than fully happy” with where you are currently.

I do agree with the one author’s view on motivational speakers. Never have found any value. Now, maybe if Cappy and JYD went on a speaking tour, I might change my mind. ;D


#4

A counterargument is that the economy is as bad as it is because of overly positive thinking, despite the major problems in the financial system. I think the point of the article is to see positives as positives and negatives as negatives. If the economy is sound and no one buys then that is just as bad as if there are systemic flaws everyone ignores.


#5

First of all, I read Barbara Ehrenreich before and consider her an idiot.

I like Andy Grove’s outlook in his book title, “Only the Paranoid Survive.” Continued analysis and self improvement, but if you work hard at doing that, you should be optimistic at accomplishing what you set out to do. Of course you have to experience success, but that breeds optimism, and should as you have confirmation of your hard work paying off. It’s self fullfilling.

IMO, some guys on this team have weaknesses that they are not working on to improve, at least not to the point where they need to be for the team to be more successful. If that’s correct, no reason to be optimistic on their part. Hard work, experience and preparation show up in crunch time.


#6

[quote=“kidcoyote, post:5, topic:574”]First of all, I read Barbara Ehrenreich before and consider her an idiot.

I like Andy Grove’s outlook in his book title, “Only the Paranoid Survive.” Continued analysis and self improvement, but if you work hard at doing that, you should be optimistic at accomplishing what you set out to do. Of course you have to experience success, but that breeds optimism, and should as you have confirmation of your hard work paying off. It’s self fullfilling.

IMO, some guys on this team have weaknesses that they are not working on to improve, at least not to the point where they need to be for the team to be more successful. If that’s correct, no reason to be optimistic on their part. Hard work, experience and preparation show up in crunch time.[/quote]

There’s a counter theory that you shouldn’t work on your weaknesses, but your strengths. The theory goes that in most cases you are not going to significantly improve your weaknesses so focusing on improving them is likely to only marginally improve your chances for success. However, working on the things you are good at might take you from being good or very goot to being great or exceptional. I think there is some truth to this, but it is not universally true. Take Shaq for example. Should he have worked harder to become a better foul shooter, or should he have worked harder on becoming the most dominant low post player in the game?


#7

This thread reminds me something one of my bosses used to say: [font=Verdana]People promise according to their hopes and perform according to their fears.[/font]


#8

One thumbs up - I like that.


#9
[quote="OzLion, post:7, topic:574"]This thread reminds me something one of my bosses used to say: [b][font=Verdana]People promise according to their hopes and perform according to their fears.[/font][/b][/quote]

One thumbs up - I like that.

I read it that this boss will manage by “fear.” I don’t want him in my company.


#10
[quote="OzLion, post:7, topic:574"]This thread reminds me something one of my bosses used to say: [b][font=Verdana]People promise according to their hopes and perform according to their fears.[/font][/b][/quote]

One thumbs up - I like that.

I read it that this boss will manage by “fear.” I don’t want him in my company.


I’m with you. I do not like this statement nor agree with it.

#11
[quote="OzLion, post:7, topic:574"]This thread reminds me something one of my bosses used to say: [b][font=Verdana]People promise according to their hopes and perform according to their fears.[/font][/b][/quote]

One thumbs up - I like that.

I read it that this boss will manage by “fear.” I don’t want him in my company.


I’m with you. I do not like this statement nor agree with it.

I disagree…I think that there are a lot of successful business people who subscribe to this. They will promise the moon to get the order, and then scramble like hell to try to deliver it.

#12
[quote="OzLion, post:7, topic:574"]This thread reminds me something one of my bosses used to say: [b][font=Verdana]People promise according to their hopes and perform according to their fears.[/font][/b][/quote]

One thumbs up - I like that.

I read it that this boss will manage by “fear.” I don’t want him in my company.

I didn’t read it that way - but I certainly understand how one could, and totally agree that I wouldn’t want someone to manage by fear.

I took it as as meaning that people fail to reach the idealistic goals that they set for themselves because of a fear of failure. Eliminate that fear and people can accomplish wondrous things. So as a manager, I would encourage people to reach for the stars with the knowledge that if they fall short, disaster won’t befall them.


#13

Life Of Brian - ALways Look On The Bright Side Of Life!


#14

Art Garfunkel did a version of this for the movie, “As Good As It Gets.” It had been years since I had seen the Python movie and when I heard it during the movie I couldn’t place it, thinking it was a standard. Which, I guess, it is!


#15

I am a fan, although not enough of a “follower”, of stoicism. It’s very good about teaching you to keep things in perspective through a number of different ways, and I would encourage anybody who’s feeling a bit too negative or anything along those lines to really look into it.

Sometimes I do sound awfully negative on here, and I’d probably be considered a negative person in general by some - but I think of it more as steadfast realism. I try not to get too high up or down, and always want to consider and maybe even attempt to defend the contrary when possible.

Agreeing with everything is boring, and extreme emotions are fleeting. Best for my own self to keep a very steady, even-handed approach to life - try to appreciate everything good and bad, but not get too worked up in either direction.

:slight_smile:


#16

[quote=“Craftsy21, post:15, topic:574”]I am a fan, although not enough of a “follower”, of stoicism. It’s very good about teaching you to keep things in perspective through a number of different ways, and I would encourage anybody who’s feeling a bit too negative or anything along those lines to really look into it.

Sometimes I do sound awfully negative on here, and I’d probably be considered a negative person in general by some - but I think of it more as steadfast realism. I try not to get too high up or down, and always want to consider and maybe even attempt to defend the contrary when possible.

Agreeing with everything is boring, and extreme emotions are fleeting. Best for my own self to keep a very steady, even-handed approach to life - try to appreciate everything good and bad, but not get too worked up in either direction.

:)[/quote]

If there’s one thing that I’ve learned from frequenting internet message boards/forums etc., it’s that everyone thinks they are the ones with the “very steady, even-handed approach to life” and it’s everyone else who is the lunatic fringe.


#17
I am a fan, although not enough of a "follower", of stoicism. It's very good about teaching you to keep things in perspective through a number of different ways, and I would encourage anybody who's feeling a bit too negative or anything along those lines to really look into it.

Sometimes I do sound awfully negative on here, and I’d probably be considered a negative person in general by some - but I think of it more as steadfast realism. I try not to get too high up or down, and always want to consider and maybe even attempt to defend the contrary when possible.

Agreeing with everything is boring, and extreme emotions are fleeting. Best for my own self to keep a very steady, even-handed approach to life - try to appreciate everything good and bad, but not get too worked up in either direction.

:slight_smile:

If there’s one thing that I’ve learned from frequenting internet message boards/forums etc., it’s that everyone thinks they are the ones with the “very steady, even-handed approach to life” and it’s everyone else who is the lunatic fringe.

Well that’s surely a backhanded way of insulting me. Appreciate it lar.


#18
I am a fan, although not enough of a "follower", of stoicism. It's very good about teaching you to keep things in perspective through a number of different ways, and I would encourage anybody who's feeling a bit too negative or anything along those lines to really look into it.

Sometimes I do sound awfully negative on here, and I’d probably be considered a negative person in general by some - but I think of it more as steadfast realism. I try not to get too high up or down, and always want to consider and maybe even attempt to defend the contrary when possible.

Agreeing with everything is boring, and extreme emotions are fleeting. Best for my own self to keep a very steady, even-handed approach to life - try to appreciate everything good and bad, but not get too worked up in either direction.

:slight_smile:

If there’s one thing that I’ve learned from frequenting internet message boards/forums etc., it’s that everyone thinks they are the ones with the “very steady, even-handed approach to life” and it’s everyone else who is the lunatic fringe.

It reminds me of the research into job performance reviews. It always goes something like this: 90 percent of people believe they are in the top 50% of performers.


#19
[quote="Craftsy21, post:15, topic:574"]I am a fan, although not enough of a "follower", of stoicism. It's very good about teaching you to keep things in perspective through a number of different ways, and I would encourage anybody who's feeling a bit too negative or anything along those lines to really look into it.

Sometimes I do sound awfully negative on here, and I’d probably be considered a negative person in general by some - but I think of it more as steadfast realism. I try not to get too high up or down, and always want to consider and maybe even attempt to defend the contrary when possible.

Agreeing with everything is boring, and extreme emotions are fleeting. Best for my own self to keep a very steady, even-handed approach to life - try to appreciate everything good and bad, but not get too worked up in either direction.

:)[/quote]

If there’s one thing that I’ve learned from frequenting internet message boards/forums etc., it’s that everyone thinks they are the ones with the “very steady, even-handed approach to life” and it’s everyone else who is the lunatic fringe.

It reminds me of the research into job performance reviews. It always goes something like this: 90 percent of people believe they are in the top 50% of performers.

Doesn’t that mean most (60%) are right abiout which half they fall in.


#20
[quote="Craftsy21, post:15, topic:574"]I am a fan, although not enough of a "follower", of stoicism. It's very good about teaching you to keep things in perspective through a number of different ways, and I would encourage anybody who's feeling a bit too negative or anything along those lines to really look into it.

Sometimes I do sound awfully negative on here, and I’d probably be considered a negative person in general by some - but I think of it more as steadfast realism. I try not to get too high up or down, and always want to consider and maybe even attempt to defend the contrary when possible.

Agreeing with everything is boring, and extreme emotions are fleeting. Best for my own self to keep a very steady, even-handed approach to life - try to appreciate everything good and bad, but not get too worked up in either direction.

:)[/quote]

If there’s one thing that I’ve learned from frequenting internet message boards/forums etc., it’s that everyone thinks they are the ones with the “very steady, even-handed approach to life” and it’s everyone else who is the lunatic fringe.

Reminds me of the famous quote by George Carlin: “Have you ever noticed that anybody driving slower than you is an idiot, and anyone going faster than you is a maniac?”