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OT: Steve Jobs Gone

Steve Jobs died today. The story’s all over the net.

Apple’s current homepage. Click on the picture.

http://www.apple.com/

Nyt obit is pretty interesting as someone who didn’t follow apple to closely over the years…
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/06/business/steve-jobs-of-apple-dies-at-56.html?pagewanted=5&_r=1&hp

Other than my parents, Steve Jobs has had more impact on my life and career than any other single person. I met him twice, and both times had a chance to say thanks.

Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes.
The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them.
About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They invent. They imagine. They heal. They explore. They create. They inspire. They push the human race forward.
Maybe they have to be crazy.
How else can you stare at an empty canvas and see a work of art? Or sit in silence and hear a song that’s never been written? Or gaze at a red planet and see a laboratory on wheels?
We make tools for these kinds of people.
While some see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.

Think Different

I was at a concert tonight and started receiving condolence texts midway through the show, without knowing what was going on. During intermission, the hall was buzzing with the news.

I never met him! But he is such a hero to me that my friends reached out to me.

I hope I’m awake and dressed if Bob Dylan beats me to the finish line, because my friends will probably storm the doors down worried about me when that happens.

In reading the news I was kind of surprised that he had invented the pc. It was so long ago, and the iPhone and iPad are so huge, I just plum forgot. Comparing him to Thomas Edison is not far fetched.

A few years ago, when the iPod came out, I remember Bill Gates saying that despite it being popular, in a few years phones would be able to do what the iPods did. He was basically knocking Apple and Jobs. He was certainly right, but he was kind of cynical, and completely missed the boat. He also knocked Next Computer, when they came out with the black and white computer, which did seem strange in the late '80’s. But once again, Gates didn’t know what he should have. It was the operating system that was valuable, and soon after, Apple bought Next and hired Jobs as CEO, after firing him just a few years earlier. What a comeback. Really an amazing story. Very private it seems, just a couple friends.

Just found this. Highly recommended. Commencement speech at Stanford. He tells 3 stories. Great lessons.

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2011/10/05/steve_jobs_moving_stanford_commencement_speech_on_mortality.html

He was hit and miss with me on a lot of things, but he was definitely an inspiration as an innovator and a businessman. Definitely sad to see him go so young, but his legacy will live on for a long time.

Nice piece, touching, funny, illuminating.

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&sqi=2&ved=0CCIQqQIwAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fonline.wsj.com%2Farticle%2FSB10001424052970203476804576613732041665792.html&ei=jjSNTtCnEqHj0QGItvla&usg=AFQjCNFuEoWynbjAjyEWP5HFA86Vklbo9A

In the whole Microsoft vs Apple thing, I always felt that Apple had better stuff, but Microsoft was better at leveraging what they had in order to turn a profit.

The last few years, I’d say Apple figured out the profit thing too.

Reading the WSJ obit…I didn’t realize how many things he failed at, despite his rich success. I guess that’s how innovators work.

[quote=“MarkH, post:8, topic:2714”]In the whole Microsoft vs Apple thing, I always felt that Apple had better stuff, but Microsoft was better at leveraging what they had in order to turn a profit.

The last few years, I’d say Apple figured out the profit thing too.[/quote]

In the early days, I think Apple’s entries were too expensive. I knew a graphics artist, who produced annual reports. He loved Apple, but when buying a new machine, he went for a Microsoft software machine. The Apple was $4,500, the Microsoft entry, about half that. In the old days, the early to mid-'80’s, stuff was expensive. I remember I bought Lotus 1-2-3 and Wordperfect. I think I paid $600 combined. And $2k for a Dell machine with a whopping 40mb hard drive.

It’s interesting that MSFT just made software, and that seemed the better model than making everything. Now, not so sure. I like the comment about Jobs saying that the design and look of the product was just as important as what was inside. Certainly seems to be true with the iPhone and iPad.

If you haven’t watched the Stanford commencement speech, I recommend it. The part about caligraphy, and what he did with it, blew me away.

The comeback of Jobs, when he returned with Next sale, is incredible. If only I had purchased the stock then. I’ve heard the comment that there are only two important things when considering buying a stock, management and price. I agree.

So true on innovators. Sometimes failures with disastrous results. This is just anecdotal, but I was reading something on Henry Kaiser, the West Coast industrialist(Kaiser Aluminum, Steel, etc., and founder of Kaiser Permanente for his empolyees) and he was building “Liberty Ships” for the WWII effort. He went to a Ford plant, and saw that they welded parts, as he was using rivets. He thought the Ford technique superior and quicker, which would allow him to produce ships faster. He ran into a problem. In the cold ocean waters, the welds didn’t hold, and ship hulls were coming apart. Back to the drawing board.

Which is interesting because as it turned out, the welds weren’t the problem, it was an inherent problem with the steel itself that was masked by riveting.

[quote="kidcoyote, post:10, topic:2714"]He went to a Ford plant, and saw that they welded parts, as he was using rivets. He thought the Ford technique superior and quicker, which would allow him to produce ships faster. He ran into a problem. In the cold ocean waters, the welds didn't hold, and ship hulls were coming apart. Back to the drawing board.[/quote]

Which is interesting because as it turned out, the welds weren’t the problem, it was an inherent problem with the steel itself that was masked by riveting.

Really? I really can’t get over Steve Jobs’ life. The comeback might be unprecedented. It was like he never lost sight of what he wanted to do, knew he was right, and never stopped going for it. His birth, the adoption criteria, dropping out of college due to the burden on his parents, sleeping on dorm room floors, studying caligraphy as a drop in, using that to build Apple fonts. It was like he was interested in life, and was going to take what it offered, and use that to make things better, useful, etc. Add in Pixar, Next, just amazing. The perseverence and singleness of mind is astonishing to me. It’s truly like Ford, Rockefeller, Edison.

In Paul Johnson’s book, “History of the American People”, he tells a story of Edison, sleeping at his desk, over 8-12 books piled up, books written by foreign authors, like Marconi, Faraday, etc., not all in English. And that he did that for weeks on end, til he figured out what he was trying to figure out. Another time, Edison worked at a firm which traded in gold, as an intern, I think. After he left, he figured he could come up with a better gold ticker, better able to get prices more quickly, etc. He decided to go back to his old firm and offer it to them. He wanted $4,000, but would take $2,500. He’d use the money to continue research. Well, he displayed it, and they asked, “how much do you want for it Tom?” To which he replied, "how much do you think it’s worth? Their answer? $40,000. He used the funds for years of research. Like Jobs, a good salesman.

IMO, not enough credit is given to companies and their leaders for the benefits they create for mankind. Non-coercively as well. Just meeting a need or desire.

Even though I don’t own any Apple products I have used them. Steve Jobs has had a huge impact on this country and taking technology to the next level. My condolences to him.

I’m not a big Apple fan, from a software developer’s perspective, due to Apple’s refusal to give into flash (no matter which side of the fence you live on there) and for how difficult they make it to develop mobile apps.

Even though I don't own any Apple products I have used them. Steve Jobs has had a huge impact on this country and taking technology to the next level. My condolences to him.

I’m not a big Apple fan, from a software developer’s perspective, due to Apple’s refusal to give into flash (no matter which side of the fence you live on there) and for how difficult they make it to develop mobile apps.

I’m not a fan either, but two of my kids have switched. One think I like? The battery life. It’s like 10 hours, vs. maybe 1.5 on my Asus. I understand software developers don’t like them. Still, a remarkable story about a guy with a vision and determination.

I work with a guy who used to run a math department in a NYC school. Circa 1980, two computer companies came to see him to sell their wares. This guy convinced a textbook seller to invoice him, despite buying no books on this invoice, so he could buy two computers, turn in the book invoice to fund buying them(yes, this goes on all the time). Well, Commodore and Apple pitched him. He went with Commodore, as he could buy 2. Apple’s price allowed him to only buy 1. Anyway, the salesman for Apple was Jobs. Funny ending was that in showing the parents the computers, they didn’t believe him. They thought they were toys and their kids were being cheated, as the Commodore’s didn’t look like the mainframe computers in the school system. But Jobs as the salesman? Getting it done.

Kid, MORE evidence of fraud in Acedemia! :o

Seriously, this actually goes on all the time? We’re not talking a box of pencils here, those 2 computers back then weren’t cheap. I mean, the guy didn’t pocket any $$ , but submitting false invoices is FRAUD and really should be treated seriously.

I’ve always found Macs to be more intuitive to use. I’m sure some of that feeling is a result of having grown up on them in my school district. First computer I ever used was a Mac in 4th grade and never touched a DOS computer until was a Senior in high school. Not sure when I first used a Windows machine. I’ve owned five computers over the years. One Windows & four Macs and prefer Macs even with the gap in pricing.

That being said, there are few things that I have always thought that MicroSoft Windows did better than Apple. Love the Windows Explorer for file management. Mac’s Finder is getting close, but it’s there yet. I also prefer Windows Media Player to iTunes. I’m not a digital music guy. I have yet to buy an mp3 and don’t have an iPod, etc. I do like to load some of my CDs on my work computer and have started using iTunes because I see an iPad in my near future. For my personal computing needs, the only thing that I do on a regular basis that I couldn’t do on a cloud based device is use my flatbed scanner & listen to MLB gameday audio on the Flashless iPad. Planning on buying an iPad & bluetooth keyboard for my birthday and relegating my MacBook to a roleplayer on the bench.

[quote=“MarkH, post:16, topic:2714”]Kid, MORE evidence of fraud in Acedemia! :o

Seriously, this actually goes on all the time? We’re not talking a box of pencils here, those 2 computers back then weren’t cheap. I mean, the guy didn’t pocket any $$ , but submitting false invoices is FRAUD and really should be treated seriously.[/quote]

As someone who has been in academia for 20+ years, this certainly does NOT go on all the time.

Kid, MORE evidence of fraud in Acedemia! :o

Seriously, this actually goes on all the time? We’re not talking a box of pencils here, those 2 computers back then weren’t cheap. I mean, the guy didn’t pocket any $$ , but submitting false invoices is FRAUD and really should be treated seriously.

As someone who has been in academia for 20+ years, this certainly does NOT go on all the time.

I’m still trying to figure out how kid thinks that his example of Jobs losing the sale to the Commodore guy demonstrates how he was “getting it done”. ::slight_smile:

I work with a guy who used to run a math department in a NYC school. Circa 1980, two computer companies came to see him to sell their wares. This guy convinced a textbook seller to invoice him, despite buying no books on this invoice, so he could buy two computers, turn in the book invoice to fund buying them(yes, this goes on all the time). Well, [b]Commodore and Apple pitched him. He went with Commodore[/b], as he could buy 2. Apple's price allowed him to only buy 1. Anyway, the salesman for Apple was Jobs. Funny ending was that in showing the parents the computers, they didn't believe him. They thought they were toys and their kids were being cheated, as the Commodore's didn't look like the mainframe computers in the school system. [b]But Jobs as the salesman? Getting it done.[/b]
[quote="MarkH, post:16, topic:2714"]Kid, MORE evidence of fraud in Acedemia! :o

Seriously, this actually goes on all the time? We’re not talking a box of pencils here, those 2 computers back then weren’t cheap. I mean, the guy didn’t pocket any $$ , but submitting false invoices is FRAUD and really should be treated seriously.[/quote]

As someone who has been in academia for 20+ years, this certainly does NOT go on all the time.

I’m still trying to figure out how kid thinks that his example of Jobs losing the sale to the Commodore guy demonstrates how he was “getting it done”. ::slight_smile:

I work with a guy who used to run a math department in a NYC school. Circa 1980, two computer companies came to see him to sell their wares. This guy convinced a textbook seller to invoice him, despite buying no books on this invoice, so he could buy two computers, turn in the book invoice to fund buying them(yes, this goes on all the time). Well, [b]Commodore and Apple pitched him. He went with Commodore[/b], as he could buy 2. Apple's price allowed him to only buy 1. Anyway, the salesman for Apple was Jobs. Funny ending was that in showing the parents the computers, they didn't believe him. They thought they were toys and their kids were being cheated, as the Commodore's didn't look like the mainframe computers in the school system. [b]But Jobs as the salesman? Getting it done.[/b]

Evidence has very pliable properties when it come to kid and his eyeballs.