PennStateHoops.com Discussion Forum

OT: School Voucher Breakout


#1

Pennsylvania leading the way? There’s also a new movie coming out, Waiting for Superman, due in two weeks, about education in the US. Highly anticipated film. There’s also another film, about a lottery held at The Apollo Theatre, for a charter school. It’s called “the lottery”.

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CB4QFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fonline.wsj.com%2Farticle%2FSB10001424052748704147804575455782883586338.html&ei=1ZmFTJDVHYT48Aakw5DuAQ&usg=AFQjCNFFV14ofmtHo9EeosIBZMTNvocWqQ

Superman link.

http://www.waitingforsuperman.com/

The Lottery website. Film opened in June.

http://thelotteryfilm.com/


#2

Also, from tomorrow’s WSJ. Must be education day. If they only had tomorrow’s sports scores. Doh. Anyway, on a lighter note about schooling.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703946504575469542721199832.html


#3

[quote=“kidcoyote, post:2, topic:1333”]Also, from tomorrow’s WSJ. Must be education day. If they only had tomorrow’s sports scores. Doh. Anyway, on a lighter note about schooling.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703946504575469542721199832.html[/quote]

Yeah, kids are soft these days. Seriously, I wish I could have sat in a car to wait for the bus. For grades 3-8, I had to take a bus to the junior high, and wait about 30 minutes for another bus to arrive to take us to my school. I remember it being so cold that my feet and hands actually hurt when we got on the bus. As silly as it sounds, why shouldn’t parents protect their kids from frost bite? I wish mine had.


#4
[quote="kidcoyote, post:2, topic:1333"]Also, from tomorrow's WSJ. Must be education day. If they only had tomorrow's sports scores. Doh. Anyway, on a lighter note about schooling.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703946504575469542721199832.html[/quote]

Yeah, kids are soft these days. Seriously, I wish I could have sat in a car to wait for the bus. For grades 3-8, I had to take a bus to the junior high, and wait about 30 minutes for another bus to arrive to take us to my school. I remember it being so cold that my feet and hands actually hurt when we got on the bus. As silly as it sounds, why shouldn’t parents protect their kids from frost bite? I wish mine had.

This drives me nuts. I have noticed, as I sit behind the bus waiting, that it’s usually the parents on the porch waiting. Who knows what the kids are doing in the house. It takes forever for them to come out of the house in a lot of cases.


#5

Who had buses!?!? My school did not have buses. I walked to school (any weather.) About 20 minutes each way.


#6

I’d have walked if it was only 20 minutes away. My school was about 6 miles away. So even walking fast it would have been a good hour and a half each way.


#7
[quote="kidcoyote, post:2, topic:1333"]Also, from tomorrow's WSJ. Must be education day. If they only had tomorrow's sports scores. Doh. Anyway, on a lighter note about schooling.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703946504575469542721199832.html[/quote]

Yeah, kids are soft these days. Seriously, I wish I could have sat in a car to wait for the bus. For grades 3-8, I had to take a bus to the junior high, and wait about 30 minutes for another bus to arrive to take us to my school. I remember it being so cold that my feet and hands actually hurt when we got on the bus. As silly as it sounds, why shouldn’t parents protect their kids from frost bite? I wish mine had.

How many people have gotten frost bite or know someone who has had frostbite either waiting for a bus or walking to school?

The school bus stops right outside my house. It’s a small neighborhood. Kids have to walk maybe 5 houses away to get there. The mothers of 2 children will drive their car to the corner (about 50 yards) so they can sit in the idling car with the heat running, waiting for the bus.

They will do this if it’s 50 degrees !!! It blows my mind.


#8

[quote=“Skeeza, post:7, topic:1333”]How many people have gotten frost bite or know someone who has had frostbite either waiting for a bus or walking to school?

The school bus stops right outside my house. It’s a small neighborhood. Kids have to walk maybe 5 houses away to get there. The mothers of 2 children will drive their car to the corner (about 50 yards) so they can sit in the idling car with the heat running, waiting for the bus.

They will do this if it’s 50 degrees !!! It blows my mind.[/quote]

Do you think they are doing for their kids or for themselves?


#9
[quote="Skeeza, post:7, topic:1333"]How many people have gotten frost bite or know someone who has had frostbite either waiting for a bus or walking to school?

The school bus stops right outside my house. It’s a small neighborhood. Kids have to walk maybe 5 houses away to get there. The mothers of 2 children will drive their car to the corner (about 50 yards) so they can sit in the idling car with the heat running, waiting for the bus.

They will do this if it’s 50 degrees !!! It blows my mind.[/quote]

Do you think they are doing for their kids or for themselves?

I think it’s both. The mom doesn’t want to stand out there. They don’t want their baby (no matter how old) to stand out there. That’s what the problem is with a lot of boys these days. They have raised by their Mom, and take on their tendencies.


#10

Hmm, I’d say that more people were raised by their mom 50 years ago then today. Moms are working and, in a lot of cases, are not stay-at-home mothers any longer. I know some stay-at-home fathers. Go back to the 1950s and this would not be the case - the mother would be staying at home.

Beside that fact, is it “wrong” or “different?” Kids now-a-days are reaching higher educational achievements while education is becoming more challenging.


#11

I think it partially has to do with how we view the world now.

Kids today are not allowed to disappear (play) into the neighborhood with friends for 6 hours without contact. People in general are more afraid of what is out there in the world. They don’t want kids abducted walking to and from Bus Stops or schools.


#12
[quote="Skeeza, post:9, topic:1333"]That's what the problem is with a lot of boys these days. They have raised by their Mom, and take on their tendencies.[/quote] Hmm, I'd say that more people were raised by their mom 50 years ago then today. Moms are working and, in a lot of cases, are not stay-at-home mothers any longer. I know some stay-at-home fathers. Go back to the 1950s and this would not be the case - the mother would be staying at home.

Beside that fact, is it “wrong” or “different?” Kids now-a-days are reaching higher educational achievements while education is becoming more challenging.

Not sure about that. Look at the clip in the opening thread, “Waiting for Superman.” The US ranks 25th in the world in math in 8th grade. IMO, middle school math is a disaster. The book used in local schools, “Connected Math”, has something like 58 uncorrected errors, after being reviewed by the former chair of the Stanford math department. Some very serious ones in terms of understanding, e.g., “Rio Rancho, NM grew in population from 1990 to 2000, going from 100,000 residents to 250,000 residents. What percentage increase in population is this?” Answer in the book: 250%. This error was duplicated by a similar question on the same page, so it was no typo. Educators are writing math books, not mathematicians. Sad. The education establishment wants “easier” books, I suppose so it makes the kids look smarter and their jobs easier. I was on a committee once, and a 5th grade math teacher wanted to reduce division problems so the kids didn’t have to do problems with 3 digit dividends, like 360/12, wanting only 2 digit dividends, like 36/12, until 6th grade. Check out www.singaporemath.com and you’ll be blown away, e.g., in 5th grade, " a fishtank measuring 14cm length by 10cm width by 16 cm high is filled to the 10cm height mark with water. If you drop a rock in, and the water line goes up to the 12cm height mark, what is the volume of the rock?" Big difference in 5th grades, don’tcha think? One avoiding dividing into 3 digits, the other doing 3 dimensions. IMO, this is not a hard problem. You just have to know how to do it. Our kids are no dumber, but they’re not being taught this. Answer: length X width X change in height, or 14 X 10 X 2, or 280 cubic centimeters. IMO, 90% of US 8th graders, not 5th graders, would get this wrong. And it’s not difficult, once you know how to do it. Problem is, teachers don’t know how to do it, not in the middle school level.


#13
[quote="Skeeza, post:9, topic:1333"]That's what the problem is with a lot of boys these days. They have raised by their Mom, and take on their tendencies.[/quote] [b]Hmm, I'd say that more people were raised by their mom 50 years ago then today. [/b] Moms are working and, in a lot of cases, are not stay-at-home mothers any longer. I know some stay-at-home fathers. Go back to the 1950s and this would not be the case - the mother would be staying at home.

Beside that fact, is it “wrong” or “different?” Kids now-a-days are reaching higher educational achievements while education is becoming more challenging.

50 years ago, there was a male figure in the household. Now, there’s a male figure for 2 days every other week.

A male figure would not stand for the mother doing what she did. With no male figure, there are no real checks to balance out what the mother is doing.

A real man is forged through adversity. A mother will do everything she can to protect her baby from adversity.


#14

Totally agree with that sentence. Good point, I agree.


#15
[quote="Skeeza, post:13, topic:1333"]A real man is forged through adversity. A mother will do everything she can to protect her baby from adversity.[/quote] Totally agree with that sentence. Good point, I agree.

Maybe, but lets not get carried away. I know plenty of overprotective fathers who think their sons can do no wrong. Its always someone else’s fault.


#16

I believe the correct term is lawyers.