PennStateHoops.com Discussion Forum

OT: Roku Player vs. AppleTV


#1

Sorry for creating another OT thread, but I need some opinions from the experts. I know Tim has mentioned he has AppleTV. Does anyone have a Roku player? What are the advantages / disadvantages of each? And which do you prefer? I’m pulling the trigger on one soon (I have done research and am leaning one direction unless one of you can convince me otherwise). Thanks.


#2

Roku is a great little company.

I think it’s going to be a content play. Who gives you access to what, and is likely to provide more in time? Apple would seem to be in the position to do that, but the content providers are leery of losing the business to them.


#3

Can someone give me a brief explanation of what Apple TV is? Do you pay for each piece of content individually?


#4

We have a Roku player at our home that we have used for a couple of years to watch Netflix movies. My wife recently got an AppleTV player and while we haven’t fully explored all its options yet, we like it because it plays Netflix movies in HD, something our 2-yr old Roku does not. So you might want to check out the HD capabilities of Roku if you go that route. Hope this helps a little.


#5

Like tim said, what kind of content do you want? And what all do you need this device to do for you? I’ve heard there’s some good jailbreaking going on with the appletv, allowing it to do a bunch of stuff it should already be able to do out of the box (1080p). But if you’re not into toying with your electronics you may want to go another direction.

There’s also the option of using a gaming system for netflix… with a ps3 you’d also be getting a very good blu-ray player and media center.


#6

I am just looking for a substitute for cable tv in a spare bedroom / office (no cable connection in the room and don’t feel like crawling in the attic with the blow insulation to run cable). The TV is only about a 20 inch LCD, so 1080p is not required. I have a netflix account already – have a computer hooked up to my family room tv for that purpose. I’m looking to get as much content as possible (top consideration) from something cheap (an important factor but not #1) and easy to use (probably #2 consideration). So content is key. But ease of use will also play a factor, as will cost.


#7

Well then I prefer Roku personally, but both are solid choices. Here’s a good comparison of them all:

http://www.engadget.com/2010/09/01/appletv-vs-the-competition-how-does-it-stack-up/

I have a WDTV Live, for what it’s worth. And I love it, but I don’t use my system the way it sounds like you will so I don’t necessarily recommend the little bit of extra money it costs.


#8

Does your 20" LCD TV have an HDMI connection? If not, your decision is made for you. Roku.


#9
[quote="mjg, post:6, topic:2424"]I am just looking for a substitute for cable tv in a spare bedroom / office (no cable connection in the room and don't feel like crawling in the attic with the blow insulation to run cable). The TV is only about a 20 inch LCD, so 1080p is not required. I have a netflix account already -- have a computer hooked up to my family room tv for that purpose. I'm looking to get as much content as possible (top consideration) from something cheap (an important factor but not #1) and easy to use (probably #2 consideration). So content is key. But ease of use will also play a factor, as will cost.[/quote]

Does your 20" LCD TV have an HDMI connection? If not, your decision is made for you. Roku.

The TV itself doesn’t. But I use a stereo receiver for sound that does have HDMI. So I can go HDMI into the stereo and RCA cords to the TV. That’s how the DVD player is hooked up too, so I know that works.


#10

I believe these are a ways away from user friendly, and that’s why Apple may next get right in the TV. However, I have a friend who is not tech savvy but not tech afraid, and I bought her an Apple TV and plugged it in, and she was glued to it for days, immediately. She found it very easy to use.


#11

I know nothing about Apple TV, but we have had a Roku HD for over a year and love it. We do Netflix and MLB.tv mostly. There are plenty of other paid and free channels. Hulu, Amazon on Demand, Pandora, UFC, etc. I like the Roku because it is small, very user friendly, and I think the user interface is strong. You can also get it for $40 less than the AppleTV.


#12

I have an Apple TV will be giving it to my Mom becuase of its good universal access. (Talking Menus)

Its content, content content. I think the winner might be Microsofts Xbox. Reason is that they are about to be hurt by google for Business OS workstations. (We don’t need a big clunky system when you are just grabbing spreadsheets and attachments).

Xbox already does ESPN3 and Microsoft really needs to nail this all in one gaming system (Especially if Sony keep giving them openings and the new Wii takes forever).

Why I originally got an apple TV and may get another in the future (If they go down to $50) is because I own a mac and its easy to access my itunes and the movies that I have loaded to play through Itunes. If you don’t have itunes set up as your primary music/movies player then give Ruku a try. Apples content is sorely lacking or expensive to purchase/rent (Same $ as Comcast).


#13

I ended up purchasing the Roku player. It came yesterday, but with someone jumping the gun and causing some excitement last night, I didn’t get it set up until tonight. I’ve already managed to locate a ton of private channel content. Does anyone have any good sources to locate content or some private channel codes they’d recommend?


#14

I think if the BTN went to AppleTV, I would cut the cord. I’d still have to think about ESPN/ABC for college football season.

Edit: oops, meant to include this: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/15/netflix-helps-people-cut-cable-cord-report-says/?ref=technology


#15

[quote=“tjb, post:14, topic:2424”]I think if the BTN went to AppleTV, I would cut the cord. I’d still have to think about ESPN/ABC for college football season.

Edit: oops, meant to include this: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/15/netflix-helps-people-cut-cable-cord-report-says/?ref=technology[/quote]

Live sporting events are pretty much the only thing that I watch in semi real time (I say semi because I usually intentionally wait a half hour or so after the start of a live event to actually start watching it on my Tivo. I pre plan things so that I can watch the event skipping commercials but ending at about the same time the live event actually does). Otherwise everything else is off of my Tivo, albeit sometimes via Hulu Plus or Netflix. Hulu Plus still includes some annoying commercials and Netflix doesn’t have all the closed captioning that I would like (they are getting better though) so neither are something that would cause me to cut my cable.