PennStateHoops.com Discussion Forum

Ot -- mlk


#1

Saw Coach Preston tweeted something about MLK.

So much has changed for us old guys.

My school district in Coatesville, Pa., was segregated when I began elementary school. White kids were bused away from their neighborhood schools to achieve this. My father worked in administration when the school board voluntarily desegregated. My Sunday School teacher picketed the decision outside my elementary school classroom window. Every school board member lost his (they were all men) re-election bid.

The theater in Coatesville required black customers to sit in the balcony.

Martin Luther King “I have a dream”

And when I was a freshman at Penn State, I used to go to the audio library in the basement of Pinchot in East Halls to listen to that speech on cassette tape - which seemed a technological marvel to me at the time.

And before I turned 50, the United States elected a black man president!

The sports world has changed, too. Black quarterbacks once had to beat back the stereotype that they were not smart enough for the position (that one makes me sick to even type), black basketball coaches were once rare, and black football coaches were non-existent (and are still rare), in part because the position required PR with influential alumni, and it was “thought” that a black coach would distance the “program” from the money people.

I dream of a world where a black coach can be just as bad as a white one – and we may be there! :slight_smile:


#2

http://onwardstate.com/2009/11/09/we-are-penn-state/


#3

When I was growing up we had two black kids in my whole school district. My buddy Sean and his sister. By the time I got to HS we had 7. A pair of brothers and their female cousins. I remember talking to the one brother before a dance and realizing what a tough go they had. At that time inter-racial affairs were not a very welcomed occurance.


#4

Don’t get me started. That story is revisionist history at work. While I’m sure the individual pieces are accurate, there is absolutely no connection between Steve Suhey’s speech in 1947 and some PSU cheerleaders inventing the "We Are… " cheer thirty years later. >:(

As noted in the comments, Town and Gown has the real story behind the cheer (the link doesn’t work but here’s a snip from the original T&G article).


The kids that created the cheer didn’t have the faintest idea what Steve Suhey had said thirty years earlier.


#5

Give JoePa credit for helping to dispel that stereotype. Mike Cooper started at QB for PSU in 1970.


#6

There is a GREAT picture that they bring out at this time of year and display in the lobby at Pattee Library of Martin Luther King, Jr., giving a speech at Rec Hall. If anyone can find it and post a link to it here, that would be wonderful. The place was jammed!!!


#7

I always found his speech the night before he was killed much more moving, no doubt (tragically) because of the way he foretold his future.

MP3 of his last speech, Memphis 1968 (40 minutes +)


#8

here’s a page from the Black History at Penn State site with photos & transcript of his speech.


#9

I had mentioned this on the Clippers forum that I post on RealGM and I’ll do the same here.

Since it is Martin Luther King Day I would like everyone to take a little time and reflect on what Dr. King did. Dr. King “fought” hard for civil rights. We are all people that live here on this Earth, so we should make the best of it to try and get along. We have come a long way with race relations. So just a small thing to remember.


#10

Very cool!


#11
here's a page from the [url=http://www.blackhistory.psu.edu/timeline/dr._martin_luther_king_jr._is_assassinated]Black History at Penn State[/url] site with photos & transcript of his speech.

Very cool!

Wow…that is very cool.

Living in Atlanta, I have had the great opportunity of attending the MLK service at Ebenezer Baptist with my young kids the past three years. While I am only able to make it through about the first 15-30 minutes before my kids get a little antsy, the experience and meaning of bringing them to the service is priceless.

While they might not totally understand my motives in “being the only white people” at the service, as my son puts it (which isn’t really true, but close), they really have gotten a unique look into the man and his teachings, and pass that along to their friends/classes at school. For one thing, they now understand that this is not just a “black” holiday. For MLK’s work crosses way beyond racial lines.

Just to walk up and down Auburn Avenue and check out both MLK’s house where he grew up and the MLK Center for Nonviolent Social Change on this day is powerful in its own right.

Thanks for posting this thread, Tim.


#12
[quote="tjb, post:1, topic:1796"]The sports world has changed, too. [b]Black quarterbacks once had to beat back the stereotype that they were not smart enough for the position[/b] (that one makes me sick to even type), black basketball coaches were once rare, and black football coaches were non-existent (and are still rare), in part because the position required PR with influential alumni, and it was "thought" that a black coach would distance the "program" from the money people.[/quote] Give JoePa credit for helping to dispel that stereotype. [url=http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1084041/index.htm]Mike Cooper started at QB for PSU in 1970[/url].
Lar, I think you might be doing a little revisonist history yourself. I know we were both there in 70'. Unfortunately, for Mike, Joe and the Penn State fans, after Mike's solid first game against Navy, things went down hill, and I mean fast. First Qtr. alone of the next game at Colorado, Cooper threw 2 interceptions and fumbled. The 31 game non beaten string came to a bitter end. Next game, loss to the Badgers, there were more interceptions. Two games later after seeing that Bob Parsons wasn't the answer, the start went to Huffy and that was all she wrote for Mike Cooper. On the year Coop completed 32 of 64 passes and had 6 int's. As I clearly recall, in the minds of too many, (unfortunately) those results did little to dispel the myth. I have read that Mike Cooper was pretty bitter about the whole ordeal.

#13
[quote="tjb, post:1, topic:1796"]The sports world has changed, too. [b]Black quarterbacks once had to beat back the stereotype that they were not smart enough for the position[/b] (that one makes me sick to even type), black basketball coaches were once rare, and black football coaches were non-existent (and are still rare), in part because the position required PR with influential alumni, and it was "thought" that a black coach would distance the "program" from the money people.[/quote] Give JoePa credit for helping to dispel that stereotype. [url=http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1084041/index.htm]Mike Cooper started at QB for PSU in 1970[/url].
Lar, I think you might be doing a little revisonist history yourself. I know we were both there in 70'. Unfortunately, for Mike, Joe and the Penn State fans, after Mike's solid first game against Navy, things went down hill, and I mean fast. First Qtr. alone of the next game at Colorado, Cooper threw 2 interceptions and fumbled. The 31 game non beaten string came to a bitter end. Next game, loss to the Badgers, there were more interceptions. Two games later after seeing that Bob Parsons wasn't the answer, the start went to Huffy and that was all she wrote for Mike Cooper. On the year Coop completed 32 of 64 passes and had 6 int's. As I clearly recall, in the minds of too many, (unfortunately) those results did little to dispel the myth. I have read that Mike Cooper was pretty bitter about the whole ordeal.

My point was that Paterno was willing to start a black quarterback. It’s similar to this year. Regardless of how Bolden performed on the field, Paterno was willing to start a first term freshman at QB. It’s Paterno’s break with the past that made the moves significant, not the actual results on the field.


#14
My point was that [b]Paterno was willing to start a black quarterback.[/b] It's similar to this year. Regardless of how Bolden performed on the field, Paterno was willing to start a first term freshman at QB. It's Paterno's break with the past that made the moves significant, not the actual results on the field.

Unfortunately that decision by Joe, when paired with the results, added support to the eroneous opinons held by those who believed the myth. In 1970 that (starting a black QB) rarely happened. Joe was willing, and that says something about Joe. If that was your point, I missed it.


#15

Unfortunately that decision by Joe, when paired with the results, added support to the eroneous opinons held by those who believed the myth. In 1970 that (starting a black QB) rarely happened. Joe was willing, and that says something about Joe. If that was your point, I missed it.[/quote]

That was the point that I was trying to make, I just didn’t do it very well.


#16

Many years ago, I read a speech that Angelo Paterno gave about equality and the rights of all Americans to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. I think this had a profound effect on Joe and has filtered through the PSU football program for decades.

Angelo Lafayette Paterno was something else. He put himself through high school, college and law school at night and eventually became a clerk in the courts in NYC.


#17

I guess this forum has a wide variety of backgrounds.

I was a minority in my high school. It was an inner-city school and I was one of the white kids. It gives a bit of a different perspective on things.


#18

I hope my memory of this story is accurate. Paterno was frustrated (circa late 60’s and early 70’s) that the Penn State administration wasn’t moving fast or far enough to make black students comfortable in the community. He egged Philadelphia Daily News sports columnist Bill Conlin into threatening to write a column on the subject to the embarrassment of the Old Main hierarchy. Conlin and then-PSU SID John Morris got into an argument about it at a pre-game press buffet and Morris ended up slugging Conlin and knocking him over the buffet table.

One of JoePa’s countless contributions to Penn State has been to agitate behind the scenes for improvements to the minority student environment at Penn State.


#19

[quote=“Evan Ceg, post:18, topic:1796”]I hope my memory of this story is accurate. Paterno was frustrated (circa late 60’s and early 70’s) that the Penn State administration wasn’t moving fast or far enough to make black students comfortable in the community. He egged Philadelphia Daily News sports columnist Bill Conlin into threatening to write a column on the subject to the embarrassment of the Old Main hierarchy. Conlin and then-PSU SID John Morris got into an argument about it at a pre-game press buffet and Morris ended up slugging Conlin and knocking him over the buffet table.

One of JoePa’s countless contributions to Penn State has been to agitate behind the scenes for improvements to the minority student environment at Penn State. [/quote]

I always liked John Morris. He was always nice to me when he had absolutely no reason to especially since I occasionally would put him in an awkward situation. One of my more memorable ones was crashing the press hospitality room at the team hotel the night before an Iowa/PSU football game in Iowa City back in the 70s. I was totally wasted and had dragged an Iowa coed along with me (sister of famed PSU cheerleader Toni Tri-Delt, so she had a bit of a PSU connection). At some point, my contact popped out and I was crawling around on the floor trying to find it in the shag carpet when Paterno walked in. He took one look at me and my coed friend (the only female in the room so she stood out like a sore thumb) and demanded to know who in the hell we were. John actually stood up for me when he clearly didn’t have to (at least long enough for me to gather up my buddy and get out of there). I always respected him for that.


#20

So is it true that 30 years later you found yourself at another PSU function in the same room with Paterno and from across the room he yelled, “hey, I know you, your that drunk that was crawling around on the floor at our get together in Iowa City back in 1971! Get that guy out a here!” ;D ;D