OT: Marcus Jordan causes a big stir before he hits the court


#1

Central Florida’s promise to Michael Jordan’s son jeopardizes school’s lucrative Adidas contract
Marcus Jordan insists on wearing his father’s famous Nike Air Jordan brand

Iliana Limon
Sentinel Staff Writer
6:21 PM CDT, October 21, 2009


#2

Interesting…

Is Illinois covered by Nike? I would assume so since I don’t remember hearing anything like this when he enrolled.


#3

[quote=“Slash, post:2, topic:135”]Interesting…

Is Illinois covered by Nike? I would assume so since I don’t remember hearing anything like this when he enrolled.[/quote]

I believe Ill is a Nike school. I find it a bit amusing that Nike agreed to an exception with PSU to allow Cael to remain with Asics, and I’m assuming the team to switch to Asics, but Addidas is saying no to Jordan.


#4
[quote="Slash, post:2, topic:135"]Interesting...

Is Illinois covered by Nike? I would assume so since I don’t remember hearing anything like this when he enrolled.[/quote]

I believe Ill is a Nike school. I find it a bit amusing that Nike agreed to an exception with PSU to allow Cael to remain with Asics, and I’m assuming the team to switch to Asics, but Addidas is saying no to Jordan.

The younger Jordan has an existing contract with Nike, however.


#5

so let me get this straight. it’s ok for Marcus to have an athletic shoe contract and retain his ncaa eligibility, but let a theater major like Darnell Autry try to get a bit role in a movie, and the ncaa goes postal.


#6

No Clue At All


#7

Follow the money.


#8
[quote="Slash, post:2, topic:135"]Interesting...

Is Illinois covered by Nike? I would assume so since I don’t remember hearing anything like this when he enrolled.[/quote]

I believe Ill is a Nike school. I find it a bit amusing that Nike agreed to an exception with PSU to allow Cael to remain with Asics, and I’m assuming the team to switch to Asics, but Addidas is saying no to Jordan.

The younger Jordan has an existing contract with Nike, however.

No he doesn’t.


#9

I have no idea where lauDan came up with that one.

Neither of the Jordan kids has a Nike contract.


#10

Illinois is a Nike school.


#11

The kid just needs to shut his mouth and wear the team shoes.


#12

Disagree. This is a classic example of promise a kid anything as long as he signs. I have no problem with the kid wanting to wear his father’s shoe. You can bet that he raised the shoe issue while he was being recruited. Undoubtedly the staff said “no problem”. They are the ones that need to be held accountable.


#13

My bad, I should have read the article.

In that case, USF should just shut its mouth and resign themselves to possibly losing their deal.


#14

Two sides to every story. But this is where parents come into play. The parents should not allow what shoes Marcus wears to cause a problem with the university. Maybe “daddy” should spend more time with his son. Then wearing “jordan shoes” might not be such a big issue.


#15

It shocks the conscience to think that things like this happen in recruiting.


#16

I don’t know which side appalls me more. The kid for demanding to wear Nike or the coaches for promising things they have no authority to promise.


#17
[quote="tjb, post:15, topic:135"]It shocks the conscience to think that things like this happen in recruiting.[/quote]

I don’t know which side appalls me more. The kid for demanding to wear Nike or the coaches for promising things they have no authority to promise.


Agreed.

#18
[quote="tjb, post:15, topic:135"]It shocks the conscience to think that things like this happen in recruiting.[/quote]

I don’t know which side appalls me more. The kid for demanding to wear Nike or the coaches for promising things they have no authority to promise.


Agreed.

If my dad had a shoe deal, I’d want to wear his shoes. What’s so appalling about that? If the school said it wasn’t a problem, then why get on Marcus? Maybe he chooses a different school and this is a non issue.


#19
[quote="tjb, post:15, topic:135"]It shocks the conscience to think that things like this happen in recruiting.[/quote]

I don’t know which side appalls me more. The kid for demanding to wear Nike or the coaches for promising things they have no authority to promise.

If my dad worked for General Motors, do you think I’d drive a Toyota?
If my dad worked for Microsoft, do you think I’d use an Apple computer?
If my dad worked for Nikon, do you think I’d take photos with a Casio?
If my dad worked for Penn State, do you think I’d root for Pitt?

I see nothing wrong with the kid wanting to wear his dad’s shoe.


#20
[quote="tjb, post:15, topic:135"]It shocks the conscience to think that things like this happen in recruiting.[/quote]

I don’t know which side appalls me more. The kid for demanding to wear Nike or the coaches for promising things they have no authority to promise.

If my dad worked for General Motors, do you think I’d drive a Toyota?
If my dad worked for Microsoft, do you think I’d use an Apple computer?
If my dad worked for Nikon, do you think I’d take photos with a Casio?
If my dad worked for Penn State, do you think I’d root for Pitt?

I see nothing wrong with the kid wanting to wear his dad’s shoe.

If my dad worked for General Motors, I wouldn’t apply for a job with Toyota and demand to drive a Chevy. I have no problem with th ekid wanting to wear Nike, I just have a problem with him demanding that an Addidas school take him and allow him to wear Nike. If wearing Nikes was that important to his choice of school, perhaps he should have limited his choices to Nike schools. Likewise, I have a problem with the coaches making promises that they have no power to make.