OT - Leo Wisniewski


#1

Watching PS FB story on the DVR, a nice piece on Stefen W.

Seeing his dad, a classmate of mine, so “normal sized” (and was even then), that he made it to the pros (first pick in the second round in a year when one team lost its first round selection, so I always considered him a first rounder) is a testament to how great a football player Leo was.


#2

[quote=“tjb, post:1, topic:87”]Watching PS FB story on the DVR, a nice piece on Stefen W.

Seeing his dad, a classmate of mine, so “normal sized” (and was even then), that he made it to the pros (first pick in the second round in a year when one team lost its first round selection, so I always considered him a first rounder) is a testament to how great a football player Leo was.[/quote]

He had a bigger rep coming out of HS than his brother Steve did. Steve certainly wound up with the longer better NFL career though.


#3
[quote="tjb, post:1, topic:87"]Watching PS FB story on the DVR, a nice piece on Stefen W.

Seeing his dad, a classmate of mine, so “normal sized” (and was even then), that he made it to the pros (first pick in the second round in a year when one team lost its first round selection, so I always considered him a first rounder) is a testament to how great a football player Leo was.[/quote]

He had a bigger rep coming out of HS than his brother Steve did. Steve certainly wound up with the longer better NFL career though.

I went to the Baseball HoF induction ceremony in 99 when Ryan, Yount, Brett & Cepeda were inducted. Brett broke down when he talked about his brothers. He said that all he ever wanted was to be as good as them and that he sometimes wonders why it was him and not them that had the HoF career. I know nothing about how the Brett Brothers were regarded as prospects growing up, but perhaps some felt that George was the lesser of the bunch.

It takes more than talent and hard work. There’s a lot of luck involved in regards to the coaches you have growing up and injuries. I often wonder what would have happened if Ki-Jana Carter hadn’t ripped up his knee his rookie year. On the other hand, what would have happened to Ki-Jana if he had ripped up his knee that badly when he was in high school?


#4
[quote="tjb, post:1, topic:87"]Watching PS FB story on the DVR, a nice piece on Stefen W.

Seeing his dad, a classmate of mine, so “normal sized” (and was even then), that he made it to the pros (first pick in the second round in a year when one team lost its first round selection, so I always considered him a first rounder) is a testament to how great a football player Leo was.[/quote]

He had a bigger rep coming out of HS than his brother Steve did. Steve certainly wound up with the longer better NFL career though.

I went to the Baseball HoF induction ceremony in 99 when Ryan, Yount, Brett & Cepeda were inducted. Brett broke down when he talked about his brothers. He said that all he ever wanted was to be as good as them and that he sometimes wonders why it was him and not them that had the HoF career. I know nothing about how the Brett Brothers were regarded as prospects growing up, but perhaps some felt that George was the lesser of the bunch.

It takes more than talent and hard work. There’s a lot of luck involved in regards to the coaches you have growing up and injuries. I often wonder what would have happened if Ki-Jana Carter hadn’t ripped up his knee his rookie year. On the other hand, what would have happened to Ki-Jana if he had ripped up his knee that badly when he was in high school?

Ken Brett was a HELL of a baseball player, surely one of the best hitting pitchers ever (I’m not sure what the stats say, I just know that you would, and Phillies managers did, use him as a pinch hitter).


#5
[quote="tjb, post:1, topic:87"]Watching PS FB story on the DVR, a nice piece on Stefen W.

Seeing his dad, a classmate of mine, so “normal sized” (and was even then), that he made it to the pros (first pick in the second round in a year when one team lost its first round selection, so I always considered him a first rounder) is a testament to how great a football player Leo was.[/quote]

He had a bigger rep coming out of HS than his brother Steve did. Steve certainly wound up with the longer better NFL career though.

I went to the Baseball HoF induction ceremony in 99 when Ryan, Yount, Brett & Cepeda were inducted. Brett broke down when he talked about his brothers. He said that all he ever wanted was to be as good as them and that he sometimes wonders why it was him and not them that had the HoF career. I know nothing about how the Brett Brothers were regarded as prospects growing up, but perhaps some felt that George was the lesser of the bunch.

It takes more than talent and hard work. There’s a lot of luck involved in regards to the coaches you have growing up and injuries. I often wonder what would have happened if Ki-Jana Carter hadn’t ripped up his knee his rookie year. On the other hand, what would have happened to Ki-Jana if he had ripped up his knee that badly when he was in high school?

The HS coach who coached the Brett’s said Ken was the best. The problem was that Ken could throw as well as hit, so he became a pro pitcher, and was kind of mediocre as a pitcher, but he could still hit. I remember him playing for the Pirates and batting 7th while pitching. When have you ever seen that? He had a beautiful swing, like George. Did not swing like a pitcher. In 14 seasons, 347 AB’s, he hit .262 with 10 hr’s. He should’ve been converted, but it’s rarely done that way, often the other. Two guys come to mind, Dan Haren and Joe Nathan. Haren was an everyday player at Pepperdine, and pitched to fill in when needed. Joe Nathan actually quit the Giants when they wanted to convert him to a pitcher, then reconsidered and returned. Believe it or not, he was a shortstop at 6’4". There have been two I recall going from pitcher to player, Rick Ankiel, and of course, the Bambino. But it seems rare to move in that direction. Many pro pitchers are players, certainly in HS, some in college, and aren’t DH’d for. Tim Hudson hit 15 hr’s at Auburn, Mark Prior was quite a hitting pitcher at USC.


#6

Leo’s NFL career was cut short by a knee injury. In the bowl game in Leo’s senior season Leo had one of PSU’s greatest defensive games ever! Game was against USC. Leo may have been undersized as a DT but he was built like the hulk. Similar to Hartenstein.


#7
[quote="tjb, post:1, topic:87"]Watching PS FB story on the DVR, a nice piece on Stefen W.

Seeing his dad, a classmate of mine, so “normal sized” (and was even then), that he made it to the pros (first pick in the second round in a year when one team lost its first round selection, so I always considered him a first rounder) is a testament to how great a football player Leo was.[/quote]

He had a bigger rep coming out of HS than his brother Steve did. Steve certainly wound up with the longer better NFL career though.

I went to the Baseball HoF induction ceremony in 99 when Ryan, Yount, Brett & Cepeda were inducted. Brett broke down when he talked about his brothers. He said that all he ever wanted was to be as good as them and that he sometimes wonders why it was him and not them that had the HoF career. I know nothing about how the Brett Brothers were regarded as prospects growing up, but perhaps some felt that George was the lesser of the bunch.

It takes more than talent and hard work. There’s a lot of luck involved in regards to the coaches you have growing up and injuries. I often wonder what would have happened if Ki-Jana Carter hadn’t ripped up his knee his rookie year. On the other hand, what would have happened to Ki-Jana if he had ripped up his knee that badly when he was in high school?

The HS coach who coached the Brett’s said Ken was the best. The problem was that Ken could throw as well as hit, so he became a pro pitcher, and was kind of mediocre as a pitcher, but he could still hit. I remember him playing for the Pirates and batting 7th while pitching. When have you ever seen that? He had a beautiful swing, like George. Did not swing like a pitcher. In 14 seasons, 347 AB’s, he hit .262 with 10 hr’s. He should’ve been converted, but it’s rarely done that way, often the other. Two guys come to mind, Dan Haren and Joe Nathan. Haren was an everyday player at Pepperdine, and pitched to fill in when needed. Joe Nathan actually quit the Giants when they wanted to convert him to a pitcher, then reconsidered and returned. Believe it or not, he was a shortstop at 6’4". There have been two I recall going from pitcher to player, Rick Ankiel, and of course, the Bambino. But it seems rare to move in that direction. Many pro pitchers are players, certainly in HS, some in college, and aren’t DH’d for. Tim Hudson hit 15 hr’s at Auburn, Mark Prior was quite a hitting pitcher at USC.

If I’m not mistaken, Tim Wakefield was an every day player who saved his career with the knuckleball. 20 years later, he’s still in the majors.