PennStateHoops.com Discussion Forum

OT: Books

At the risk of offending some people who don’t like big words in a written medium, I thought I’d start a thread to accompany the movie, music, food, etc threads.

Reamde: A Novel by Neal Stephenson came out today. It’s supposedly a more “readable” action story after his last book, Anathem, bogged down with an alternate universe exploring philosophy. I didn’t mind slogging through Anathem, but I’m excited that Reamde might be more of a page turner.

Stephenson is, in my opinion, the greatest long-form novelist of several generations, if not ever. His entire body of work is super, but if you haven’t read any Stephenson before, I’d suggest starting with Snow Crash.

I’m always working through about 3 books at once, from 3 different areas of writing typically.

I’m finally getting around to finish Moneyball just a few days before the stinking movie gets released. I’ve had this book for 4 or 5 years now and keep passing over it for something else. I’m really enjoying it, about 2/3 of the way through it. This would be my miscellaneous, non-fiction reading which typically consists of business and technology books, with science and history sprinkled in. :smiley:

From my modern fiction pile I’m about halfway through Consider The Lobster by DFW. He’s probably my favorite author although I still have a few things from him I need to read, including the monster Infinite Jest and his final, posthumous novel that is also quite hefty.

And from my classic literature pile I’m working through Kerouac’s On The Road.

Probably be better off if I stuck with one at a time, but I get a little ADD anymore. I blame the internet.

Michael Lewis is the best non-fiction writer of his generation.

I just finished “Of Mice and Men.” Short and not a word wasted. Superb writing and a superb story.

Does anyone here with an iPad use it to read books? On my iPhone I have the kindle, ibook and nook apps. I’m not impressed with any on the phone, so I don’t use them. Do any of you have a favorite to recommend? My in-laws bought me an iPad for Christmas (the one coming up) and I’ve been holding off buying a couple of books until I decided on a format. If someone can convince me which way to go, I can get started using my phone.

I love reading on the iPad. I’m still buying books, but stuff that I am not likely to keep (business books, tech books, which go out of date about when they are published) and classics (which are free) I read on the iPad, usually using the Apple iBooks app.

I do.

I use it to read myself to sleep and I like the fact that it’s back lit so I don’t have to put a light on while reading. I haven’t tried reading it in bright sunlight but I imagine it would be problematic. The downside is that I have a first generation iPad which is a noticeably heavy (I was sorely tempted to trade it in on an iPad2 but decided this year’s major tech expenditure would be an iPhone5 and that I’d hold off til next year for the next generation iPad).

I use both the Apple Book app and the Kindle app, specifically their Cloud Reader. It’s responsive enough that you can’t tell that you are using a cloud based service and it saves space on the iPad (I only have the 16GB WiFi version).

I like the magazine apps that are starting to appear. Conde Nast has several that are pretty slick (I subscribe to Golf Digest and read in on the iPad - the iPad version is free if you are a Golf Digest subscriber). I play around with magic as a hobby and have several magic books/articles/magazines that are on the iPad also.

[quote="mjg, post:5, topic:2679"]Does anyone here with an iPad use it to read books? On my iPhone I have the kindle, ibook and nook apps. I'm not impressed with any on the phone, so I don't use them. Do any of you have a favorite to recommend? My in-laws bought me an iPad for Christmas (the one coming up) and I've been holding off buying a couple of books until I decided on a format. If someone can convince me which way to go, I can get started using my phone.[/quote]

I love reading on the iPad. I’m still buying books, but stuff that I am not likely to keep (business books, tech books, which go out of date about when they are published) and classics (which are free) I read on the iPad, usually using the Apple iBooks app.

My current iPad library consists of:

Magic:

  • The Expert at the Card Table - S.W. Erdnase
  • Spectral Chill (Tarot Below Zero) - Jeff Stone
  • Stone Cold Frixon - Jeff Stone
  • 202 Methods of Forcing - Theo Annemann
  • Exclusive Secrets of Annemann’s Conception - Theo Annemann
  • Annemann’s Card Magic - Theo Annemann
  • Best of the Sankey Magic Newsletter - Jay Sankey
  • The Magical Arts Journal - various magicians
  • Magicseen Magazine 38, 39, and 40
  • Flash Cards - Craig Petty
  • Magic Magazine - 8 issues from the last year.

Sports:

  • Golf Digest Magazine - last 5 issues
  • 2010-11 Basketball Prospectus (soon to be replaced by the 2011-12 version) - John Gasaway, Ken Pomeroy, et al
  • Basketball on Paper - Dean Oliver

Tech:

  • Effortless Flex 4 Development - Larry Ullman

Classics:

  • The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

[quote=“Craftsy21, post:2, topic:2679”]I’m always working through about 3 books at once, from 3 different areas of writing typically.

I’m finally getting around to finish Moneyball just a few days before the stinking movie gets released. I’ve had this book for 4 or 5 years now and keep passing over it for something else. I’m really enjoying it, about 2/3 of the way through it. This would be my miscellaneous, non-fiction reading which typically consists of business and technology books, with science and history sprinkled in. :smiley:

From my modern fiction pile I’m about halfway through Consider The Lobster by DFW. He’s probably my favorite author although I still have a few things from him I need to read, including the monster Infinite Jest and his final, posthumous novel that is also quite hefty.

And from my classic literature pile I’m working through Kerouac’s On The Road.

Probably be better off if I stuck with one at a time, but I get a little ADD anymore. I blame the internet.[/quote]

Good book, Moneyball. One thing I feel like Beane didn’t talk about, and may have hidden, was the importance of defense. Maybe he just doesn’t see it as important, but IMO, defense and pitching more important than hitting and OBP. Due to pitching, IMO, the Phillies are a lock, like the '84 Tigers or '90 Reds. Yankees OBP and hitting won’t mean a thing, IMO. Not with their tired arms. As Yogi stated, at least in the first part “Good pitching stops good hitting…and vice versa.”

Readme gets some interesting reviews, Ben. “Stephenson’s REAMDE: perfectly executed, mammoth, ambitious technothriller…a triumph, all 980 pages of it.” Large.

I'm always working through about 3 books at once, from 3 different areas of writing typically.

I’m finally getting around to finish Moneyball just a few days before the stinking movie gets released. I’ve had this book for 4 or 5 years now and keep passing over it for something else. I’m really enjoying it, about 2/3 of the way through it. This would be my miscellaneous, non-fiction reading which typically consists of business and technology books, with science and history sprinkled in. :smiley:

From my modern fiction pile I’m about halfway through Consider The Lobster by DFW. He’s probably my favorite author although I still have a few things from him I need to read, including the monster Infinite Jest and his final, posthumous novel that is also quite hefty.

And from my classic literature pile I’m working through Kerouac’s On The Road.

Probably be better off if I stuck with one at a time, but I get a little ADD anymore. I blame the internet.

Good book, Moneyball. One thing I feel like Beane didn’t talk about, and may have hidden, was the importance of defense. Maybe he just doesn’t see it as important, but IMO, defense and pitching more important than hitting and OBP. Due to pitching, IMO, the Phillies are a lock, like the '84 Tigers or '90 Reds. Yankees OBP and hitting won’t mean a thing, IMO. Not with their tired arms. As Yogi stated, at least in the first part “Good pitching stops good hitting…and vice versa.”

Readme gets some interesting reviews, Ben. “Stephenson’s REAMDE: perfectly executed, mammoth, ambitious technothriller…a triumph, all 980 pages of it.” Large.

I thought Moneyball addressed the fact that at the time, they couldn’t figure out what it was worth. They operated to some extent that it is wasn’t worth anything. That’s one reason they moved the kid to first base, not sure he could play it.

The view on defense has changed since but I don’t know the details.

They definitely do talk about defense a bit, but it’s clear to me that it wasn’t as conclusive as the offensive side. They also tried to overcome bad defense with scoring more runs.

[quote=“UncleLar, post:8, topic:2679”]Tech:

  • Effortless Flex 4 Development - Larry Ullman[/quote]

I’ve found it certainly to be more effortless than the “Pain in the ass Flex 3 development”.

My wife went from hardcover books to the Kindle and now to the IPAD. She loves the IPAD. I “read” all my books via Audible because law school did me in for reading for pleasure.

My favorite author is John Grisham followed by Pat Conroy who wrote “The Great Santini”.

Tech: - Effortless Flex 4 Development - Larry Ullman

I’ve found it certainly to be more effortless than the “Pain in the ass Flex 3 development”.

I had a nice project in mind for the recruiting matrix but, like many projects of mine, once I got part way into it, I got distracted and never finished it.

[quote="UncleLar, post:8, topic:2679"]Tech: - Effortless Flex 4 Development - Larry Ullman[/quote]

I’ve found it certainly to be more effortless than the “Pain in the ass Flex 3 development”.

I had a nice project in mind for the recruiting matrix but, like many projects of mine, once I got part way into it, I got distracted and never finished it.

I did the FOS passing charts in Flex 4 (thanks to knowledge gained after being thrown into the fire for a work project that was Flex 3).

http://archive.psuplaybook.org:7070/passchartui/

[quote=“Great Santini, post:13, topic:2679”]My wife went from hardcover books to the Kindle and now to the IPAD. She loves the IPAD. I “read” all my books via Audible because law school did me in for reading for pleasure.

My favorite author is John Grisham followed by Pat Conroy who wrote “The Great Santini”.[/quote]

Living in the South, not much beats going to Hilton Head or some of the beaches around Charleston, picking up a good Pat Conroy book and losing yourself in the surf and sand. My neighbor who lives across the street in Atlanta is a noted author himself and a good friend of Pat’s. He used to visit when in Atlanta, and I told him that the next time he’s on the street to let me know, as I have several books of his for him to sign.

[quote="UncleLar, post:8, topic:2679"]Tech: - Effortless Flex 4 Development - Larry Ullman[/quote]

I’ve found it certainly to be more effortless than the “Pain in the ass Flex 3 development”.

I had a nice project in mind for the recruiting matrix but, like many projects of mine, once I got part way into it, I got distracted and never finished it.

I did the FOS passing charts in Flex 4 (thanks to knowledge gained after being thrown into the fire for a work project that was Flex 3).

http://archive.psuplaybook.org:7070/passchartui/

I saw them and figured as much (very slick by the way - thumbs up).

For my project, I was inspired by this:

http://www.fat-brain.com/football/notredame.html

The little shopping cart in the upper right corner was a big clue. You might recognize this as a modification of the Flash sample store. I thought I could do something similar for us by modifying the sample. Unfortunately, it turns out that the store sample code is from a couple of releases ago and isn’t a part of Flex 4. I started looking into building it from scratch, then got distracted (more accurately, spring and golf season arrived). If I get the urge, I might try again this winter.

How do you buy books on the Kindle app on an iPhone? I can’t find a link to a store. I also don’t see any explanation or instructions within the app.

You have to use the safari app on your iPhone to buy books. Apple instituted a new policy that it would take 30% of any sale, made through an app or by an app directing a user to a website. Amazon

More on the (idiotic) policy here: Apple Just Declared War On Amazon Kindle - Business Insider
and here: Apple's disruption of the ebook market has nothing to do with the tablet | The Idea Logical Company

You can’t anymore. Amazon and Apple got in a p*ssing contest over fees so Amazon removed the Kindle Store button from the app. To buy books you either do it from your computer or use your phone browser to go to Amazon.com/kindlestore