PennStateHoops.com Discussion Forum

OT: Big Ten might take look at summer baseball


#1

Big Ten might take look at summer baseball
By Associated Press
Thursday, March 1, 2012

Some interesting ideas being kicked around.


#2

I don’t like it. There are already plenty of summer options for players, why would anyone want to play their college ball in the summer while basically admitting to yourself you’re a second class league.


#3

If that happens I wonder how that will affect the Spikes?


#4

I like change. But, I’m not sure of how I like this idea. Will the summer league players be full time students at the time?? I would have a lot of questions.
BUT, the NCAA would need to limit (strictly) the total number of games. I see the southern schools wanting to play “both/all” seasons.


#5

[quote=“tundra, post:4, topic:3135”]I like change. But, I’m not sure of how I like this idea. Will the summer league players be full time students at the time?? I would have a lot of questions.
BUT, the NCAA would need to limit (strictly) the total number of games. I see the southern schools wanting to play “both/all” seasons. [/quote]

Apparently they do…from the linked article

NCAA rules don't prohibit conferences or individual schools from playing in the summer, as long as they don't exceed 56 regular-season games.

#6

[quote=“timauman, post:5, topic:3135”][quote]NCAA rules don’t prohibit conferences or individual schools from playing in the summer, as long as they don’t exceed 56 regular-season games.
[/quote][/quote]

56 games!! …and they’re worried that a football playoff during the Christmas holiday would take football players away from class. ???


#7

I wonder what is the definition of “regular season” games. … ::)…let’s talk about TOTAL games.
I bet the loop holes are a mile wide in “regular season!”


#8

The last Big Ten team to make the College World Series final eight was Michigan in 1984…wow.

I will say that my son has been playing baseball outdoors in Atlanta, pretty much since the first week of January. His team just played in a big tournament with about 50 teams across four age groups this past weekend and has another scheduled for this weekend.

The kids do play year round down here and from a very young age. The level of their play is quite stunning. My son’s 10 year old team got bounced from last week’s tourney on a 250 foot walk off home run.

So by the time these kids get to college, kids up north are already playing from behind, in my opinion.


#9

I remember a few years ago that the northern schools were pushing for the season to start 2 weeks later to reduce their need to barnstorm across the south for the first month. Did that ever go thru or does it still start at the same time of year?


#10

How many southern teams ever make the NCAA hockey Final Four?


#11

And they don’t care…whereas they do care about the sport of baseball up north. Yankees, Red Sox, Phillies, Cubs, Tigers…and the list goes on.

I was a huge Rangers fan growing up, but once I moved down South I lost the NHL and the Rangers for good. Having the Thrashers in Atlanta for a number of years didn’t change that. There are a few good youth hockey leagues here, but the best athletes play football, baseball, basketball, soccer and now lacrosse down here.


#12

[quote=“tundra, post:10, topic:3135”]How many southern teams ever make the NCAA hockey Final Four?[/quote]That is irrelevant. NCAA hockey, like hoops, is played inside, so there is no advantage whether it is 90 degrees or 15 degrees with snow on the ground. Baseball is played outside and the NCAA season is scheduled to start at a date when it is not feasible to expect northern teams to be able to play at home. It is a tremendous playing and recruiting advantage to be in a warm climate. More home games and less time away from school traveling.


#13
How many southern teams ever make the NCAA hockey Final Four?
That is irrelevant. NCAA hockey, like hoops, is played inside, so there is no advantage whether it is 90 degrees or 15 degrees with snow on the ground. Baseball is played outside and the NCAA season is scheduled to start at a date when it is not feasible to expect northern teams to be able to play at home. It is a tremendous playing and recruiting advantage to be in a warm climate. More home games and less time away from school traveling.

OK, then do 1 of 2 things…

either build domed baseball stadiums on campus,

or come up with another ‘related’ sport, kinda like ‘Arena Baseball’ :wink:

There really is no good comparison. The best corrolation I can come up with is if the NCAA had a fall Skiing sport. The south, although having some ski facilities, would start much later than the north. Any early season competition would have to be done with a barnstorming trip up north.

Something needs to be done, the numbers don’t lie.

Perhaps global warming will solve this problem for us !!! ;D


#14

Why is it OK for football to play in cold weather, but not baseball?


#15

Its not necessarily the temperature it is the snow and ice on the ground.


#16

Have you ever hit a baseball when it’s cold? It’s not so much fun.


#17
Why is it OK for football to play in cold weather, but not baseball?

Have you ever hit a baseball when it’s cold? It’s not so much fun.

I’m sure it’s not fun trying to throw/catch a cold football, either.


#18
[quote="Tom, post:14, topic:3135"]Why is it OK for football to play in cold weather, but not baseball?[/quote]

Have you ever hit a baseball when it’s cold? It’s not so much fun.

I’m sure it’s not fun trying to throw/catch a cold football, either.

I always enjoyed it.


#19

An errant pass from the QB isn’t going to kill anyone…


#20
[quote="Tom, post:14, topic:3135"]Why is it OK for football to play in cold weather, but not baseball?[/quote]

An errant pass from the QB isn’t going to kill anyone…

A cold baseball isn’t any more dangerous than a warm one.