PennStateHoops.com Discussion Forum

New and Improved Penn State Basketball


#1

I thoroughly enjoyed the first game of the season for this year’s Penn State basketball team and the first game under new head coach Pat Chambers. Although I was initially suspect at the hire, what I saw at the Hartford game on Saturday afternoon has me feeling good about Chambers. While only time will tell as to his success at PSU, I liked what I saw, if only for one game.

My observations on the game are as follows (and these observations are based only the one game sample of which I saw):

Gone was the chuck-and-duck offense which all too often saw the players run down the shot clock to be left with either a) a high ball screen, leaving TB (or any other player at the point) to attack the basket or b) a late shot clock heave (Usually also from TB) from 20+ feet or so. Chambers ran an motion offense that allowed for some nice open looks; if only the players were more adept at knocking down those shots.

On defense, the use of 1-2-2 3/4 court press with traps at half court. This defensive pressure, when combined with some tight on-the-ball defense (along with good denial one pass away) lead to more steals I have seen in a single Penn State game in the past 10 seasons. Chambers has his defensive players playing much tighter on the ball along along with tighter defense off-the-ball, especially on those players “one pass away”. This defensive pressure lead to many steals and tipped or deflected passes, while also leading to a few back door cuts and many drives to the basket from the Hartford players after beating their defensive man off the dribble.

My biggest concern is whether the back side (or weak side) defensive players are capable enough to rotate in such situations and cut off the dribble penetration. There were several occasions when Penn State defensive players stepped up and drew charging fouls (3-4 by my recollection, although not all were drawn off dribble drives after beating a defensive player on the perimeter).

Offensively, this team had difficulty knocking down either open shots or close “bunny” lay-ups. The post players especially had difficulty hitting their in-close looks, as there were too many missed layups/putbacks. I can recall Jon Graham missing 5 close shots and Ross Travis missing 1 or 2 others.

Cam Woodyard also struggled with his open looks, missing a layup, an open pull-up jumper from the foul line (off a nice drive to his right from the wing) and missing an open 6-7 foot jumper from the right baseline in the second half. Woodyard only had range from beyond the arc, hitting all 4 of his FGs from 3-point range.

Sasa looked uneasy in the paint at times. He had few touches and at least two of those he did have resulted in one turnover and another unsuccessful drive penetration, which he kicked back out without a shot attempt.

Tim Frazier was aggressive attacking the basket, at times too aggressive (like he was channeling TB in those situations). While he had some nice dribble penetration, on at least as many occasions, his drives to the basket seemed to be a force in the action, resulting in a contested layup and too many misses for so many close shots to the hoop.

Billy Oliver had a nice start making his first two baskets. Unfortunately, his last two attempts (both from beyond the arc) did not draw iron. I was a little disappointed to not see him continue the momentum he created in the early stages of the first half.

It was refreshing to see Chambers rotate in 9 players within the first 5 minutes of the game. Nick Colella was effective on the 3/4 trap press, grabbing one steal and forcing another turnover.

Matt Glover played a lot of minutes, but also struggled from the field. He had a solid physical presence, grabbing more than a handful of rebounds. Unfortunately, his shot was vastly inconsistent.

Finally, I am quite surprised there isn’t more talk on here about Trey Lewis. Lewis adeptly handled the point guard duties at times in the first half after Tim Frazier sat with his second foul in the first half. He was tenacious defensively and was not shy at putting up his shots. He hit two pull up 3-pointers from the wing (eerily similar to those that TB would knock down the past four seasons) and was effective using his athleticism to create his shot. I am a little disappointed that more people aren’t abuzz about how well Lewis played in his first collegiate game. 17 points along with better than 50% FG %? Thats cause for celebration, especially in his opening game, regardless of who the competition was.

One other positive note was the effective rebounding on both the offensive and defensive sides of the ball. The Lions did an excellent job on the offensive glass. Next step is to start knocking down those inside put backs and “bunnies”. The team also did a nice job clearing the defensive boards, as there were few offensive rebounds I could recall for Hartford.

The most disappointing thing from the game (aside from some weak FG shooting) was poor FT shooting. The players did an excellent job getting to the line. Now the players need to start knocking down their freebies and make teams pay for committing so many fouls.

All-in-all, I was extremely impressed with the intensity and energy of this year’s team. They were hustling throughout the game, diving for loose balls and creating turnovers with a great defensive presence. I decided to co-opt the teams motto for this season “Pure Energy” as my new screen name. While it is a tad cheesy (especially for those who remember the 80s song “What’s On Your Mind”, which used Leonard Nimoy to sing the line “Pure Energy” at points in the song), it does effectively capture the intensity of this year’s team, especially on defense (which is a welcome change).

Information society - pure energy


#2

One question I have is whether any of our big men are adept/capable of playing an up tempo game…can they get up and down the floor and play in a motion offense? I guess I have seen far too many big men at PSU cut from the Mike Peapos/S. Witkowsky mold. We know that at Nova, Jay Wright was not inclined to give these types of player much PT. Given your first look at the big men, what do you eventually think the starting line-up and rotation will be, as well as a long term projection of the potential of the post players?


#3

I can’t yet say whether the big men I saw would be able to run an uptempo style. They are athletic and ran the court fairly well, but the fast break offense was less than effective, especially considering the number of steals they had compared the the low shooting percentage for the game.

The motion for the big men was good, they just did a poor job completing a lot of good looks . I am not optimistic on the long-term prospects of the big men, based on what I saw Saturday. Sasa looked uneasy in the post, while Graham and Travis showed off some great athleticism, without polish. Graham could have had 4-6 points if he had been more effective hitting his close shots. Considering the number of offensive rebounds the big men earned, they could find some easy points inside, if they can learn to finish.

Billy Oliver looked much more effective getting open looks on the perimeter, rather than in the post. He might be effective popping out and knocking down 3s, if he can hit them more consistently than the other night.

It might be a few games before the starting lineup finally fleshes itself out. Perhaps the impending return of Marshall will settle things, although that could leave the team with a smaller lineup, yet more defensively aggressive and quicker up and down the court.


#4

[quote=“Pure Energy, post:3, topic:2820”]I can’t yet say whether the big men I saw would be able to run an uptempo style. They are athletic and ran the court fairly well, but the fast break offense was less than effective, especially considering the number of steals they had compared the the low shooting percentage for the game.

The motion for the big men was good, they just did a poor job completing a lot of good looks . I am not optimistic on the long-term prospects of the big men, based on what I saw Saturday. Sasa looked uneasy in the post, while Graham and Travis showed off some great athleticism, without polish. Graham could have had 4-6 points if he had been more effective hitting his close shots. Considering the number of offensive rebounds the big men earned, they could find some easy points inside, if they can learn to finish.

Billy Oliver looked much more effective getting open looks on the perimeter, rather than in the post. He might be effective popping out and knocking down 3s, if he can hit them more consistently than the other night.

It might be a few games before the starting lineup finally fleshes itself out. Perhaps the impending return of Marshall will settle things, although that could leave the team with a smaller lineup, yet more defensively aggressive and quicker up and down the court.[/quote]

2 post players going against their very first D-I opponents ever, and another coming back from a blown ACL.

Don’t rush to judgement on that game. The post is the hardest position to adjust to when you step up from high school to college. I usually consider the first year as simply a learning experience and pretty much a throw-away (unless you are a blue chip or 1st round draft pick).


#5

First - welcome to the board.

Second - you must have slept through a lot of games over the last ten years. There’s a good chance that there have been somewhere around 50 Penn State games over the last ten years where we had as many steals.

Last year there were six games where we had as many or more steals (7) than we did Saturday.

They were:
Lehigh = 7
Furman = 9
Duquesne = 8
Maine = 9
Purdue = 9
Illinois = 9

Heck, in his first official game in a PSU uniform, Stanley Pringle had seven steals on his own (PSU had 12 total).

PS - getting “fact checked” by UncleLar is a right of passage here. Welcome aboard and don’t take it personal. ;D


#6

PSU had 15 steals Saturday night

http://www.gopsusports.com/sports/m-baskbl/stats/2011-2012/psuhart1.html


#7
I can't yet say whether the big men I saw would be able to run an uptempo style. They are athletic and ran the court fairly well, but the fast break offense was less than effective, especially considering the number of steals they had compared the the low shooting percentage for the game.

The motion for the big men was good, they just did a poor job completing a lot of good looks . I am not optimistic on the long-term prospects of the big men, based on what I saw Saturday. Sasa looked uneasy in the post, while Graham and Travis showed off some great athleticism, without polish. Graham could have had 4-6 points if he had been more effective hitting his close shots. Considering the number of offensive rebounds the big men earned, they could find some easy points inside, if they can learn to finish.

Billy Oliver looked much more effective getting open looks on the perimeter, rather than in the post. He might be effective popping out and knocking down 3s, if he can hit them more consistently than the other night.

It might be a few games before the starting lineup finally fleshes itself out. Perhaps the impending return of Marshall will settle things, although that could leave the team with a smaller lineup, yet more defensively aggressive and quicker up and down the court.

2 post players going against their very first D-I opponents ever, and another coming back from a blown ACL.

Don’t rush to judgement on that game. The post is the hardest position to adjust to when you step up from high school to college. I usually consider the first year as simply a learning experience and pretty much a throw-away (unless you are a blue chip or 1st round draft pick).


I am not rushing to judgement yet. As I said, based on what I saw Saturday. Graham had a slightly better game tonight and Travis had a nice baseline slam dunk, showing some power to the basket. On a positive note, the post players look fairly good in their rebounding position and blockout responsibilities.

#8
[quote="Pure Energy, post:1, topic:2820"]On defense, the use of 1-2-2 3/4 court press with traps at half court. This defensive pressure, when combined with some tight on-the-ball defense (along with good denial one pass away)[b] lead to more steals I have seen in a single Penn State game in the past 10 seasons.[/b] Chambers has his defensive players playing much tighter on the ball along along with tighter defense off-the-ball, especially on those players "one pass away". This defensive pressure lead to many steals and tipped or deflected passes, while also leading to a few back door cuts and many drives to the basket from the Hartford players after beating their defensive man off the dribble.[/quote]

First - welcome to the board.

Second - you must have slept through a lot of games over the last ten years. There’s a good chance that there have been somewhere around 50 Penn State games over the last ten years where we had as many steals.

Last year there were six games where we had as many or more steals (7) than we did Saturday.

They were:
Lehigh = 7
Furman = 9
Duquesne = 8
Maine = 9
Purdue = 9
Illinois = 9

Heck, in his first official game in a PSU uniform, Stanley Pringle had seven steals on his own (PSU had 12 total).

PS - getting “fact checked” by UncleLar is a right of passage here. Welcome aboard and don’t take it personal. ;D


Thanks for the welcome.

As Penn State had 15 steals in Saturday’s game, perhaps you can remind me of the last time they had that many steals in recent history?


#9
[quote="Pure Energy, post:1, topic:2820"]On defense, the use of 1-2-2 3/4 court press with traps at half court. This defensive pressure, when combined with some tight on-the-ball defense (along with good denial one pass away)[b] lead to more steals I have seen in a single Penn State game in the past 10 seasons.[/b] Chambers has his defensive players playing much tighter on the ball along along with tighter defense off-the-ball, especially on those players "one pass away". This defensive pressure lead to many steals and tipped or deflected passes, while also leading to a few back door cuts and many drives to the basket from the Hartford players after beating their defensive man off the dribble.[/quote]

First - welcome to the board.

Second - you must have slept through a lot of games over the last ten years. There’s a good chance that there have been somewhere around 50 Penn State games over the last ten years where we had as many steals.

Last year there were six games where we had as many or more steals (7) than we did Saturday.

They were:
Lehigh = 7
Furman = 9
Duquesne = 8
Maine = 9
Purdue = 9
Illinois = 9

Heck, in his first official game in a PSU uniform, Stanley Pringle had seven steals on his own (PSU had 12 total).

PS - getting “fact checked” by UncleLar is a right of passage here. Welcome aboard and don’t take it personal. ;D


Thanks for the welcome.

As Penn State had 15 steals in Saturday’s game, perhaps you can remind me of the last time they had that many steals in recent history?

:-[ Goddamn it. Now I have to go find one. ;D


#10
[quote="Pure Energy, post:1, topic:2820"]On defense, the use of 1-2-2 3/4 court press with traps at half court. This defensive pressure, when combined with some tight on-the-ball defense (along with good denial one pass away)[b] lead to more steals I have seen in a single Penn State game in the past 10 seasons.[/b] Chambers has his defensive players playing much tighter on the ball along along with tighter defense off-the-ball, especially on those players "one pass away". This defensive pressure lead to many steals and tipped or deflected passes, while also leading to a few back door cuts and many drives to the basket from the Hartford players after beating their defensive man off the dribble.[/quote]

First - welcome to the board.

Second - you must have slept through a lot of games over the last ten years. There’s a good chance that there have been somewhere around 50 Penn State games over the last ten years where we had as many steals.

Last year there were six games where we had as many or more steals (7) than we did Saturday.

They were:
Lehigh = 7
Furman = 9
Duquesne = 8
Maine = 9
Purdue = 9
Illinois = 9

Heck, in his first official game in a PSU uniform, Stanley Pringle had seven steals on his own (PSU had 12 total).

PS - getting “fact checked” by UncleLar is a right of passage here. Welcome aboard and don’t take it personal. ;D


Thanks for the welcome.

As Penn State had 15 steals in Saturday’s game, perhaps you can remind me of the last time they had that many steals in recent history?

In a strategy that preceded “Moneyball,” Penn State had terrible rebounding teams around the turn of the century, so assistant coach Chuck Swenson thought they needed to make up for that somehow. So they conceded some of the boards and worked instead on steals – which Titus Ivory, Joe Crispin and Brandon Watkins were pretty good at.

When ED came in, he went to work on rebounding, and we were a pretty good rebounding team during his time.


#11
[quote="Pure Energy, post:1, topic:2820"]On defense, the use of 1-2-2 3/4 court press with traps at half court. This defensive pressure, when combined with some tight on-the-ball defense (along with good denial one pass away)[b] lead to more steals I have seen in a single Penn State game in the past 10 seasons.[/b] Chambers has his defensive players playing much tighter on the ball along along with tighter defense off-the-ball, especially on those players "one pass away". This defensive pressure lead to many steals and tipped or deflected passes, while also leading to a few back door cuts and many drives to the basket from the Hartford players after beating their defensive man off the dribble.[/quote]

First - welcome to the board.

Second - you must have slept through a lot of games over the last ten years. There’s a good chance that there have been somewhere around 50 Penn State games over the last ten years where we had as many steals.

Last year there were six games where we had as many or more steals (7) than we did Saturday.

They were:
Lehigh = 7
Furman = 9
Duquesne = 8
Maine = 9
Purdue = 9
Illinois = 9

Heck, in his first official game in a PSU uniform, Stanley Pringle had seven steals on his own (PSU had 12 total).

PS - getting “fact checked” by UncleLar is a right of passage here. Welcome aboard and don’t take it personal. ;D


Thanks for the welcome.

As Penn State had 15 steals in Saturday’s game, perhaps you can remind me of the last time they had that many steals in recent history?

:-[ Goddamn it. Now I have to go find one. ;D

Illinois - March 11th 2002. ;D

My apologies.


#12

Graham does not have much athleticism, not sure what game you were watching. Looks like his vertical is not that much and a little rigid on the floor. Didn’t show me any shot blocking ability at all. Hope he can continue to learn and maybe continue to bulk up in the offseason to muscle some guys off the ball.


#13
[quote="Pure Energy, post:1, topic:2820"]On defense, the use of 1-2-2 3/4 court press with traps at half court. This defensive pressure, when combined with some tight on-the-ball defense (along with good denial one pass away)[b] lead to more steals I have seen in a single Penn State game in the past 10 seasons.[/b] Chambers has his defensive players playing much tighter on the ball along along with tighter defense off-the-ball, especially on those players "one pass away". This defensive pressure lead to many steals and tipped or deflected passes, while also leading to a few back door cuts and many drives to the basket from the Hartford players after beating their defensive man off the dribble.[/quote]

First - welcome to the board.

Second - you must have slept through a lot of games over the last ten years. There’s a good chance that there have been somewhere around 50 Penn State games over the last ten years where we had as many steals.

Last year there were six games where we had as many or more steals (7) than we did Saturday.

They were:
Lehigh = 7
Furman = 9
Duquesne = 8
Maine = 9
Purdue = 9
Illinois = 9

Heck, in his first official game in a PSU uniform, Stanley Pringle had seven steals on his own (PSU had 12 total).

PS - getting “fact checked” by UncleLar is a right of passage here. Welcome aboard and don’t take it personal. ;D


Thanks for the welcome.

As Penn State had 15 steals in Saturday’s game, perhaps you can remind me of the last time they had that many steals in recent history?

:-[ Goddamn it. Now I have to go find one. ;D

Illinois - March 11th 2002. ;D

My apologies.

Mine as well.

I should have stated “in the past nine years”. :wink:


#14
[quote="Pure Energy, post:1, topic:2820"]On defense, the use of 1-2-2 3/4 court press with traps at half court. This defensive pressure, when combined with some tight on-the-ball defense (along with good denial one pass away)[b] lead to more steals I have seen in a single Penn State game in the past 10 seasons.[/b] Chambers has his defensive players playing much tighter on the ball along along with tighter defense off-the-ball, especially on those players "one pass away". This defensive pressure lead to many steals and tipped or deflected passes, while also leading to a few back door cuts and many drives to the basket from the Hartford players after beating their defensive man off the dribble.[/quote]

First - welcome to the board.

Second - you must have slept through a lot of games over the last ten years. There’s a good chance that there have been somewhere around 50 Penn State games over the last ten years where we had as many steals.

Last year there were six games where we had as many or more steals (7) than we did Saturday.

They were:
Lehigh = 7
Furman = 9
Duquesne = 8
Maine = 9
Purdue = 9
Illinois = 9

Heck, in his first official game in a PSU uniform, Stanley Pringle had seven steals on his own (PSU had 12 total).

PS - getting “fact checked” by UncleLar is a right of passage here. Welcome aboard and don’t take it personal. ;D


Thanks for the welcome.

As Penn State had 15 steals in Saturday’s game, perhaps you can remind me of the last time they had that many steals in recent history?

:-[ Goddamn it. Now I have to go find one. ;D

Illinois - March 11th 2002. ;D

My apologies.

Mine as well.

I should have stated “in the past nine years”. :wink:

And actually, that may not be right either. The record books lists the PSU team record for steals as 15 against Illinois on March 11, 2002. Unfortunately, I can’t find any record of us having played Illinois on that date - so who knows?


#15

KenPom ratings:

Hartford - 334
Radford - 292

Will withhold my judgement.


#16

[quote=“Pure Energy, post:1, topic:2820”]I thoroughly enjoyed the first game of the season for this year’s Penn State basketball team and the first game under new head coach Pat Chambers. Although I was initially suspect at the hire, what I saw at the Hartford game on Saturday afternoon has me feeling good about Chambers. While only time will tell as to his success at PSU, I liked what I saw, if only for one game.

My observations on the game are as follows (and these observations are based only the one game sample of which I saw):

Gone was the chuck-and-duck offense which all too often saw the players run down the shot clock to be left with either a) a high ball screen, leaving TB (or any other player at the point) to attack the basket or b) a late shot clock heave (Usually also from TB) from 20+ feet or so. Chambers ran an motion offense that allowed for some nice open looks; if only the players were more adept at knocking down those shots.

On defense, the use of 1-2-2 3/4 court press with traps at half court. This defensive pressure, when combined with some tight on-the-ball defense (along with good denial one pass away) lead to more steals I have seen in a single Penn State game in the past 10 seasons. Chambers has his defensive players playing much tighter on the ball along along with tighter defense off-the-ball, especially on those players “one pass away”. This defensive pressure lead to many steals and tipped or deflected passes, while also leading to a few back door cuts and many drives to the basket from the Hartford players after beating their defensive man off the dribble.

My biggest concern is whether the back side (or weak side) defensive players are capable enough to rotate in such situations and cut off the dribble penetration. There were several occasions when Penn State defensive players stepped up and drew charging fouls (3-4 by my recollection, although not all were drawn off dribble drives after beating a defensive player on the perimeter).

Offensively, this team had difficulty knocking down either open shots or close “bunny” lay-ups. The post players especially had difficulty hitting their in-close looks, as there were too many missed layups/putbacks. I can recall Jon Graham missing 5 close shots and Ross Travis missing 1 or 2 others.

Cam Woodyard also struggled with his open looks, missing a layup, an open pull-up jumper from the foul line (off a nice drive to his right from the wing) and missing an open 6-7 foot jumper from the right baseline in the second half. Woodyard only had range from beyond the arc, hitting all 4 of his FGs from 3-point range.

Sasa looked uneasy in the paint at times. He had few touches and at least two of those he did have resulted in one turnover and another unsuccessful drive penetration, which he kicked back out without a shot attempt.

Tim Frazier was aggressive attacking the basket, at times too aggressive (like he was channeling TB in those situations). While he had some nice dribble penetration, on at least as many occasions, his drives to the basket seemed to be a force in the action, resulting in a contested layup and too many misses for so many close shots to the hoop.

Billy Oliver had a nice start making his first two baskets. Unfortunately, his last two attempts (both from beyond the arc) did not draw iron. I was a little disappointed to not see him continue the momentum he created in the early stages of the first half.

It was refreshing to see Chambers rotate in 9 players within the first 5 minutes of the game. Nick Colella was effective on the 3/4 trap press, grabbing one steal and forcing another turnover.

Matt Glover played a lot of minutes, but also struggled from the field. He had a solid physical presence, grabbing more than a handful of rebounds. Unfortunately, his shot was vastly inconsistent.

Finally, I am quite surprised there isn’t more talk on here about Trey Lewis. Lewis adeptly handled the point guard duties at times in the first half after Tim Frazier sat with his second foul in the first half. He was tenacious defensively and was not shy at putting up his shots. He hit two pull up 3-pointers from the wing (eerily similar to those that TB would knock down the past four seasons) and was effective using his athleticism to create his shot. I am a little disappointed that more people aren’t abuzz about how well Lewis played in his first collegiate game. 17 points along with better than 50% FG %? Thats cause for celebration, especially in his opening game, regardless of who the competition was.

One other positive note was the effective rebounding on both the offensive and defensive sides of the ball. The Lions did an excellent job on the offensive glass. Next step is to start knocking down those inside put backs and “bunnies”. The team also did a nice job clearing the defensive boards, as there were few offensive rebounds I could recall for Hartford.

The most disappointing thing from the game (aside from some weak FG shooting) was poor FT shooting. The players did an excellent job getting to the line. Now the players need to start knocking down their freebies and make teams pay for committing so many fouls.

All-in-all, I was extremely impressed with the intensity and energy of this year’s team. They were hustling throughout the game, diving for loose balls and creating turnovers with a great defensive presence. I decided to co-opt the teams motto for this season “Pure Energy” as my new screen name. While it is a tad cheesy (especially for those who remember the 80s song “What’s On Your Mind”, which used Leonard Nimoy to sing the line “Pure Energy” at points in the song), it does effectively capture the intensity of this year’s team, especially on defense (which is a welcome change).

Information society - pure energy[/quote]

From the looks of your first post to this topic I would think you were that “Sweet16” character that tested the bandwidth of this board a few years back. But, every one of his posts were that long and clearly you can control yourself on most posts. As it is, I’ll still nickname you “Information Society” since you can certainly write a novel. Welcome aboard.


#17

[quote=“noobd, post:15, topic:2820”]KenPom ratings:

Hartford - 334
Radford - 292

Will withhold my judgement.[/quote]

The trend is good!


#18

That was from the 2010-11 media guide (haven’t picked up this year’s yet).

So I went back to an earlier one.

From the 2009-10 guide:

The team record for steals in a game is 19 against Indiana (PA) in 1982.
The Big Ten team record for steals in a game is 16 against NW on Jan 13th, 2001.

I haven’t a clue what was going on with the media guide last year.


#19
[quote="Pure Energy, post:1, topic:2820"]On defense, the use of 1-2-2 3/4 court press with traps at half court. This defensive pressure, when combined with some tight on-the-ball defense (along with good denial one pass away)[b] lead to more steals I have seen in a single Penn State game in the past 10 seasons.[/b] Chambers has his defensive players playing much tighter on the ball along along with tighter defense off-the-ball, especially on those players "one pass away". This defensive pressure lead to many steals and tipped or deflected passes, while also leading to a few back door cuts and many drives to the basket from the Hartford players after beating their defensive man off the dribble.[/quote]

First - welcome to the board.

Second - you must have slept through a lot of games over the last ten years. There’s a good chance that there have been somewhere around 50 Penn State games over the last ten years where we had as many steals.

Last year there were six games where we had as many or more steals (7) than we did Saturday.

They were:
Lehigh = 7
Furman = 9
Duquesne = 8
Maine = 9
Purdue = 9
Illinois = 9

Heck, in his first official game in a PSU uniform, Stanley Pringle had seven steals on his own (PSU had 12 total).

PS - getting “fact checked” by UncleLar is a right of passage here. Welcome aboard and don’t take it personal. ;D


Thanks for the welcome.

As Penn State had 15 steals in Saturday’s game, perhaps you can remind me of the last time they had that many steals in recent history?

:-[ Goddamn it. Now I have to go find one. ;D

I said on here months ago that the biggest difference with this program will be w/ defense and hustle. There is already a difference on the defensive end as far as on ball pressure. I wasn’t sure if Chambers was going to trap a lot right away, but they’re doing it.

Wait till Chambers adds more depth through recruiting. This team will trap, defend, rebound, and get up and down the floor. There will be lots of substituting and keeping guys fresh. Someone asked if he’s subbing a lot to find the right mix. He’s subbing to keep guys fresh. Jay Wright subs a ton too.

There are going to be rough days, but I hope we support this guy in the form of butts in the seats. I went to my first game since 01’ this past Saturday.


#20

[quote=“Cletus11, post:12, topic:2820”]Graham does not have much athleticism, not sure what game you were watching. Looks like his vertical is not that much and a little rigid on the floor. Didn’t show me any shot blocking ability at all. Hope he can continue to learn and maybe continue to bulk up in the offseason to muscle some guys off the ball.[/quote]I was watching the Hartford game, from center court, nine rows up.

The Graham I saw showed athleticism in his quickness rotating on the backside of the man defense, position on offensive rebounds, and his quickness moving up and down the court; and all in just nine minutes of play.

He still needs to improve his defensive footwork and his ability to finish on those inside shots. He also has to become a better free throw shooter. He did show some improvement tonight against Radford, going 3-5.

He is also showing to be the teams best offensive rebounder in the first two games, with 6 offensive rebounds in just 29 minutes of action. Those are excellent numbers, especially within a small number of minutes of action.

Finally, he seems capable of catching the ball when fed to him, which is a welcome change for a Penn State post player.