Lion Heath Drafted in 5th Rnd


#1

Ben Heath PSU Catcher (JR) drafted in 5th round 153 overall to the Houston Astros.

Congrats to him. I would think he would sign being that high in the draft.


#2

2nd team all-american…given the partial scholarship scene in college baseball, 5th round money is hard to turn down


#3

Did anyone hear the story of the first overall pick? A 17 year old kid that dropped out of high school to get his GED and went to a 2 year college so that he could start on his baseball career early?


#4

Yeah, crazy story. But if you are smart enough and can play ball, why not? Hoops players are going to Europe now to bypass the one year of unpaid college ball.


#5

Was glancing over the first few rounds of the draft and saw a couple familiar names – Mel Rojas Jr. and Dickie Thon. The Pirates took Rojas Jr. in the third round. Odds on him being as successful as another “Jr.” (the one that just retired)? Okay, just wishful thinking.


#6

I hear the kid is real douche. One look at how he wears his eye-black confirms it. ::slight_smile:


#7

There was also Delino DeShields jr and Steve Bedrosian’s son(aka Bedrock)


#8
[quote="mjg, post:5, topic:1218"]Was glancing over the first few rounds of the draft and saw a couple familiar names -- Mel Rojas Jr. and Dickie Thon. The Pirates took Rojas Jr. in the third round. Odds on him being as successful as another "Jr." (the one that just retired)? Okay, just wishful thinking.[/quote] There was also Delino DeShields jr and Steve Bedrosian's son(aka Bedrock)

Cool. I didn’t look that closely at it. Was mainly looking at who the Pirates drafted – lots of pitching at the top of their draft. Wonder how many other sons of former major leaguers (or other pro athletes) were drafted.


#9

Unlike drafts in other sports, the MLB draft is never an indication of who will get signed. A lot of teams have a budget for rookies, and a set number of spots in their organization. I couldn’t find a list of 5th round picks from last year that showed which picks got signed. But it wouldn’t surprise me if it was less than 75%. I’ll keep digging to see if I can find anything.


#10
[quote="mjg, post:5, topic:1218"]Was glancing over the first few rounds of the draft and saw a couple familiar names -- Mel Rojas Jr. and Dickie Thon. The Pirates took Rojas Jr. in the third round. Odds on him being as successful as another "Jr." (the one that just retired)? Okay, just wishful thinking.[/quote] There was also Delino DeShields jr and Steve Bedrosian's son(aka Bedrock)

Cool. I didn’t look that closely at it. Was mainly looking at who the Pirates drafted – lots of pitching at the top of their draft. Wonder how many other sons of former major leaguers (or other pro athletes) were drafted.

Two sons of current managers were taken - by the team’s they manage.

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10159/1064058-100.stm


#11
[quote="Skeeza, post:3, topic:1218"]Did anyone hear the story of the first overall pick? A 17 year old kid that dropped out of high school to get his GED and went to a 2 year college so that he could start on his baseball career early?[/quote]

I hear the kid is real douche. One look at how he wears his eye-black confirms it. ::slight_smile:

A lot of kids wear eye-black like that while in high school these days, including a current PSU football player from my alma mater who is definitely not a douche. I think it looks stupid, but its not out of the ordinary.


#12
[quote="mjg, post:5, topic:1218"]Was glancing over the first few rounds of the draft and saw a couple familiar names -- Mel Rojas Jr. and Dickie Thon. The Pirates took Rojas Jr. in the third round. Odds on him being as successful as another "Jr." (the one that just retired)? Okay, just wishful thinking.[/quote] There was also Delino DeShields jr and Steve Bedrosian's son(aka Bedrock)

Cool. I didn’t look that closely at it. Was mainly looking at who the Pirates drafted – lots of pitching at the top of their draft. Wonder how many other sons of former major leaguers (or other pro athletes) were drafted.

Lots of them. If you listen to the actual draft, you’ll find that there are usually a couple in every round who are related, usually son, to a major leaguer of some sort. The teams like to announce the relationship when they draft the kid.

Pirate Draft Choices (potential future State College Spikes)


#13
[quote="mjg, post:5, topic:1218"]Was glancing over the first few rounds of the draft and saw a couple familiar names -- Mel Rojas Jr. and Dickie Thon. The Pirates took Rojas Jr. in the third round. Odds on him being as successful as another "Jr." (the one that just retired)? Okay, just wishful thinking.[/quote] There was also Delino DeShields jr and Steve Bedrosian's son(aka Bedrock)

Cool. I didn’t look that closely at it. Was mainly looking at who the Pirates drafted – lots of pitching at the top of their draft. Wonder how many other sons of former major leaguers (or other pro athletes) were drafted.

Pirate Management (I don’t remember if it was Coonelly or Huntington) was interviewed during the game broadcast last night. He talked about the first 2 picks. Both high potential HS kids pitchers. He used the “IF” word many times taking about signing them.


#14

Leyland’s son drafted by Tigers (surprise)

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/s_685122.html

The kid played youth baseball and HS in my area. (Leyland family still lives in Pgh.) Good sized kid. About 6-2. The move to catcher was a good idea. He looks like a pretty decent athlete BUT I don’t think he played any other sports in HS.

P.S. The Tigers also drafted Ozzie Guillen’s son.


#15
[quote="manatree, post:2, topic:1218"]2nd team all-american........given the partial scholarship scene in college baseball, 5th round money is hard to turn down[/quote]

Unlike drafts in other sports, the MLB draft is never an indication of who will get signed. A lot of teams have a budget for rookies, and a set number of spots in their organization. I couldn’t find a list of 5th round picks from last year that showed which picks got signed. But it wouldn’t surprise me if it was less than 75%. I’ll keep digging to see if I can find anything.

I remember hearing a GM and an agent talk about the baseball draft on the radio.

I don’t remember details ( :-X ), but the just of it was that the kids want to be draft in the first 3 or 5 rounds, but NOT in rounds 6 to 12. They would prefer to be drafted after the 12th round.

reason was somewhat of what mjg was refering to, either each team has a budget to sign players in certain rounds, or there is a structure to the contracts signed in those rounds. It may not make sense, but that structure ends after whichever round (12th?), at which point the draftee can negotiate ANY price.


#16

Skeeza,
I think what you’re talking about after the 12th round is similar to undrafted players in the NFL draft (for instance). Sometimes it’s actualyl better for the player NOT to be taken in the last round. Therefore, if he’s undrafted he’s free to try-out and negotiate with ANY team. Often-times a guy can better match his skills with a team’s needs that way and stand a better chance to make a roster.

That’s also why the NFL only has like 6 rounds now, as opposed to the old days when there were 11 or 12… The player’s union negotiated that just for this reason, so more players have the opportunity to find a team that’s a better match for them.

What’s unique about baseball is the slotting procedures, which I don’t even pretend to understand. All I know is that it was implemented a few years ago to help the small-market teams draft better. It was a BIG problem a few years back where teams like the Pirates would pass on, say, the #4 guy and actaully draft someone much lower in the projected order so that they could sign that player to a lower contract. It also avoids the whole “Boras” effect where a kid will hold out for big $$ (using going back into the draft as an option, Ala Scott Rolen) and the team ended up completely losing that pick… What was happening was really good talent was being bypassed by the small market teams because of signability concerns, and those players were dropping to the likes of the Yanks and RedSox who had the coin to stike a deal, thus defeating the whole “worst drafts first” philosophy (and further loading the big market teams with even MORE talent). There’s also a provision now where if a team doesn’t sign a player by a certian date, the player goes back into the next year’s draft, and the team gets to re-pick during that draft.

It’s all very confusing… and an even bigger crap-shoot than the other sports.


#17

[quote=“MarkH, post:16, topic:1218”]Skeeza,
I think what you’re talking about after the 12th round is similar to undrafted players in the NFL draft (for instance). Sometimes it’s actualyl better for the player NOT to be taken in the last round. Therefore, if he’s undrafted he’s free to try-out and negotiate with ANY team. Often-times a guy can better match his skills with a team’s needs that way and stand a better chance to make a roster.

That’s also why the NFL only has like 6 rounds now, as opposed to the old days when there were 11 or 12… The player’s union negotiated that just for this reason, so more players have the opportunity to find a team that’s a better match for them.

What’s unique about baseball is the slotting procedures, which I don’t even pretend to understand. All I know is that it was implemented a few years ago to help the small-market teams draft better. It was a BIG problem a few years back where teams like the Pirates would pass on, say, the #4 guy and actaully draft someone much lower in the projected order so that they could sign that player to a lower contract. It also avoids the whole “Boras” effect where a kid will hold out for big $$ (using going back into the draft as an option, Ala Scott Rolen) and the team ended up completely losing that pick… What was happening was really good talent was being bypassed by the small market teams because of signability concerns, and those players were dropping to the likes of the Yanks and RedSox who had the coin to stike a deal, thus defeating the whole “worst drafts first” philosophy (and further loading the big market teams with even MORE talent). There’s also a provision now where if a team doesn’t sign a player by a certian date, the player goes back into the next year’s draft, and the team gets to re-pick during that draft.

It’s all very confusing… and an even bigger crap-shoot than the other sports.[/quote]

I don’t think Rolen was in the draft twice-are you thinking of JD Drew?


#18

[quote=“MarkH, post:16, topic:1218”]Skeeza,
I think what you’re talking about after the 12th round is similar to undrafted players in the NFL draft (for instance). Sometimes it’s actualyl better for the player NOT to be taken in the last round. Therefore, if he’s undrafted he’s free to try-out and negotiate with ANY team. Often-times a guy can better match his skills with a team’s needs that way and stand a better chance to make a roster.

That’s also why the NFL only has like 6 rounds now, as opposed to the old days when there were 11 or 12… The player’s union negotiated that just for this reason, so more players have the opportunity to find a team that’s a better match for them.

What’s unique about baseball is the slotting procedures, which I don’t even pretend to understand. All I know is that it was implemented a few years ago to help the small-market teams draft better. It was a BIG problem a few years back where teams like the Pirates would pass on, say, the #4 guy and actaully draft someone much lower in the projected order so that they could sign that player to a lower contract. It also avoids the whole “Boras” effect where a kid will hold out for big $$ (using going back into the draft as an option, Ala Scott Rolen) and the team ended up completely losing that pick… What was happening was really good talent was being bypassed by the small market teams because of signability concerns, and those players were dropping to the likes of the Yanks and RedSox who had the coin to stike a deal, thus defeating the whole “worst drafts first” philosophy (and further loading the big market teams with even MORE talent). There’s also a provision now where if a team doesn’t sign a player by a certian date, the player goes back into the next year’s draft, and the team gets to re-pick during that draft.

It’s all very confusing… and an even bigger crap-shoot than the other sports.[/quote]

I think you mean JD Drew.

Yes, the “slotting” system works to a degree. But it’s not a concrete signing price like the NBA. There are still negotiations, and Scott Boras clients are still scaring away small market teams.

With 50 rounds, a team might only sign half of their picks. So a team might decide they have $15 million to sign picks. They need X pitchers, Y infielders, Z outfielders and maybe a catcher or two. So they start to negotiate with their picks. Typically, teams want to sign their top picks. But they also don’t want to overpay for someone that could be 7 years away from having an impact. So maybe their top pick cost them $5 million. Now they only have $10 million left for the other 24 signees (assuming they sign half). As they sign players, the amount of $$ left decreases as do the number of slots. So it’s not unusual for a team to only sign half of their top 10 picks as well as half of their total number of picks. The whole thing is a numbers game. If you want to turn pro as a 5th round pick, you better be ready to accept a reasonable offer. Otherwise, the team might decide to sign other picks instead.

Also, keep in mind, even the first overall pick isn’t likely to have an impact for a year or two (Strasburg seems to be an exception). So a 5th round pick probably projects to at least 3-5 years in the minors. No team wants to overpay for a player that won’t make the team for at least that long. And isn’t considered an impact player (those get taken in the first round).


#19

Another thing to consider is that Heath is a Jr. who just had a monster year. Is he going to gamble that he can improve his stock with one more year at PSU or does he want to start his 3-5 years in the minors now?

I’m guessing that he signs and heads to Talor’s old stomping grounds, with a return to the Med on Aug 7th.


#20
[quote="MarkH, post:16, topic:1218"]Skeeza, I think what you're talking about after the 12th round is similar to undrafted players in the NFL draft (for instance). Sometimes it's actualyl better for the player NOT to be taken in the last round. Therefore, if he's undrafted he's free to try-out and negotiate with ANY team. Often-times a guy can better match his skills with a team's needs that way and stand a better chance to make a roster.

That’s also why the NFL only has like 6 rounds now, as opposed to the old days when there were 11 or 12… The player’s union negotiated that just for this reason, so more players have the opportunity to find a team that’s a better match for them.

What’s unique about baseball is the slotting procedures, which I don’t even pretend to understand. All I know is that it was implemented a few years ago to help the small-market teams draft better. It was a BIG problem a few years back where teams like the Pirates would pass on, say, the #4 guy and actaully draft someone much lower in the projected order so that they could sign that player to a lower contract. It also avoids the whole “Boras” effect where a kid will hold out for big $$ (using going back into the draft as an option, Ala Scott Rolen) and the team ended up completely losing that pick… What was happening was really good talent was being bypassed by the small market teams because of signability concerns, and those players were dropping to the likes of the Yanks and RedSox who had the coin to stike a deal, thus defeating the whole “worst drafts first” philosophy (and further loading the big market teams with even MORE talent). There’s also a provision now where if a team doesn’t sign a player by a certian date, the player goes back into the next year’s draft, and the team gets to re-pick during that draft.

It’s all very confusing… and an even bigger crap-shoot than the other sports.[/quote]

I don’t think Rolen was in the draft twice-are you thinking of JD Drew?

Sorry… You’re right. I was thinking of Drew.