Free Throws


#1

ED has mentioned multiple times that the team lifts THEN practices free throws. In other words, he’s greatly fatiguing their arms and then sending them off to practice free throws. Wouldn’t that lead to the team pushing their free throws with rested arms, and the notorious low % that ED’s teams have had? Perhaps he should change his routine.


#2

It’s worth noting that they shoot 70.6% from the line. Not that shabby…just a struggle the past two games. But good point either way.


#3

Yeah, I know that this season has improved, but when looking at ED’s career here. It was atrocious other years.


#4

Does not sound right.
Funny story. Couple of years ago I was coaching a HS summer league. One of our better players was a very muscular football first kid. Anyway early in the game he is fouled. 2 shots. First one hit the top of the square. 2nd one hit even higher on the backboard. Both shots may have left dents. Running back up the board he nears the bench and tells me “I was just lifting.”


#5

We need to get more FTA’s, not necessarily shoot them better. Some guys hardly get any.


#6

I don’t remember him ever saying that but if true given the teams free throw shooting improvement this year, maybe more teams ought to try that approach.


#7

I don’t think it really matters, honestly. If you can shoot free throws, you can shoot free throws. There’s a period of time after lifting where your shot might be off a bit, but these guys aren’t lifting for huge gains IN season.

Let’s quit reading into things so much - there’s not some magical answer as to what is going to turn this into a top 25 team this season.


#8

[quote=“Craftsy21, post:7, topic:621”]I don’t think it really matters, honestly. If you can shoot free throws, you can shoot free throws. There’s a period of time after lifting where your shot might be off a bit, but these guys aren’t lifting for huge gains IN season.

Let’s quit reading into things so much - there’s not some magical answer as to what is going to turn this into a top 25 team this season. [/quote]

I don’t know but I think it would depend if you were working biceps or triceps. If you were working tris, using a pushing motion you might have a tendency to push the shot long, working bis, using a pulling motion might make a shot short. Would be interesting to do a study on it.


#9
[quote="Craftsy21, post:7, topic:621"]I don't think it really matters, honestly. If you can shoot free throws, you can shoot free throws. There's a period of time after lifting where your shot might be off a bit, but these guys aren't lifting for huge gains IN season.

Let’s quit reading into things so much - there’s not some magical answer as to what is going to turn this into a top 25 team this season.[/quote]

I don’t know but I think it would depend if you were working biceps or triceps. If you were working tris, using a pushing motion you might have a tendency to push the shot long, working bis, using a pulling motion might make a shot short. Would be interesting to do a study on it.

I know it definitely messed you up for a few hours after doing so - but it takes more than a few minutes of working those muscles to erase years of muscle memory and rehearsed coordination in a shooting motion.

Frankly - the terms push and pull shouldn’t really be involved in talking about a shooting form lol. It’s much more of a flick if anything, so I think generally you just lose touch from what I remember. But so long as you still have your release - which I believe is most important, you’ll be alright once the feeling comes back to you. :slight_smile:


#10

I go to the Gym 4 days a week. My primary interests are shoot baskets, aerobic, weights. I always shoot baskets and I alternate the aerobic and weights.
I always shoot first but two times when the court was too busy and it was weight day I did weights first. When I got out on the court and went to shoot it was like “forget this, no way”. In my lift routine I do both bicep and tricep and bench (among others). On a personal experience basis, lifting is definitely shot altering. If the gym court is busy and it is a weight day I skip shooting. I can’t imagine a BB shooting routine that would lead with lifting and follow with shooting.


#11

I just know it’s not the big deal it might be mAde to be. You definitely don’t have great feel but it goes away After a short while. :slight_smile:


#12

[quote=“Craftsy21, post:7, topic:621”]I don’t think it really matters, honestly. If you can shoot free throws, you can shoot free throws. There’s a period of time after lifting where your shot might be off a bit, but these guys aren’t lifting for huge gains IN season.

Let’s quit reading into things so much - there’s not some magical answer as to what is going to turn this into a top 25 team this season. [/quote]

Boy, that’s the understatement of the year so far !!! I know it’s akin to asking a kid with HDAD to sit still or telling a fish not to flop around, but from time to time, people on a forum need to reel it in.

You can go back and forth on this all day. When do you practice free throws, before or after practice? The players stroke will be different depending on them having frsh legs at the beginning of the game, or fatigued legs at the end, so which do you prepare for?

It’s an endless loop, and in this case, I think it is making an issue out of nothing.


#13

I went to a game over break with a friend from back home (real big basketball fan, 1,000 pt scorer in high school, etc), and on the ride home the post-game show was on (1450 AM). They interviewed ED and asked about the horrendous FT shooting in the game (it was the Wisky game) and ED started off by saying (paraphrased) “we have a routine where we lift then shoot free throws every day, blah blah.” My friend immediately pointed this out - he goes to St. John’s and doesn’t follow PSU hoops, so it’s not like he’s reading into every possible thought like this board does. Rather, just using past experience and basketball 101.

It just took me awhile till I remembered to post it.

EDIT: Just to clarify, he commented that you shouldn’t lift and THEN shoot free throws


#14

[quote=“State4Life, post:13, topic:621”]I went to a game over break with a friend from back home (real big basketball fan, 1,000 pt scorer in high school, etc), and on the ride home the post-game show was on (1450 AM). They interviewed ED and asked about the horrendous FT shooting in the game (it was the Wisky game) and ED started off by saying (paraphrased) “we have a routine where we lift then shoot free throws every day, blah blah.” My friend immediately pointed this out - he goes to St. John’s and doesn’t follow PSU hoops, so it’s not like he’s reading into every possible thought like this board does. Rather, just using past experience and basketball 101.

It just took me awhile till I remembered to post it.[/quote]
I can’t tell what he pointed out. Just an acknowledgement that they do it, that in his opinion they they do it and it doesn’t matter, or that he dosn’t understand why you would lift and then shoot fouls.


#15

If that was a question directed at me - he commented that you shouldn’t lift and THEN shoot free throws.


#16

High School Harry says you shouldn’t lift and then do free throws.

vs

A coaching staff with 60+ years of college coaching experiences thinking it’s ok.

Who ya gonna go with? ???

And given how well we’ve shot for most of the season, why is this even a question?


#17

Has anyone been able to confirm whether this is actually what occurs in practice? It may be that Ed was merely pointing out what all is included in the “routine” and mistakenly listed some things out of order.

It would seem to be common sense that if one were to practice free throws with a goal of improving percentage of FT shots made then practicing in a physical state as close to in-game condition would be important. Wouldn’t practicing foul shots when your arms feel like rubber be the same as practicing foul shots with wrist weights on?

One of our best foul shooters ever, Joe Crispin, would always finish the pre-game and half-time shoot arounds with at least a half dozen or so foul shots. Often, the other players would already be in the huddle and Joe was still trying to get in one or two more foul shots. Does anyone see any of our current players practicing foul shots during the shoot arounds?


#18

Don’t know about PSU but I seen a lot of HS pregame shoot a rounds. Most are laughable in that NO ONE shoots from inside the 3 pt line . Except for some foul shots.
I was taught to “shoot the shots you plan on shooting in the game” during pregame warm-ups.
No wonder why many college teams have little “inside scoring.”


#19

[quote=“tundra, post:18, topic:621”]Don’t know about PSU but I seen a lot of HS pregame shoot a rounds. Most are laughable in that NO ONE shoots from inside the 3 pt line . Except for some foul shots.
I was taught to “shoot the shots you plan on shooting in the game” during pregame warm-ups.
No wonder why many college teams have little “inside scoring.”[/quote]

Heck, you see that at 8th grade games. Everyone is launching threes and the kids can barely get the ball to the rim. That line has done more to impede the progress of young shooters than Playstation and Xbox combined.


#20

You guys are showing your age. ;D