ESPN announces announcing lineup for hoops


#1

Bummer - look like no Erin Andrews visit to Happy Valley this season.

Here’s how their line-up looks.

Saturday prime time (Jan. 16–March 6): Dan Shulman, Dick Vitale, Erin Andrews
Select games: Dan Shulman, Dick Vitale, Doris Burke
Monday Big East: Sean McDonough, Jay Bilas, Bill Raftery
Monday Big 12: Brent Musburger, Bob Knight, Holly Rowe
Tuesday Big Ten: Dave O’Brien or Brent Musburger, Steve Lavin, Erin Andrews
Tuesday SEC: Brad Nessler, Jimmy Dykes, Jeannine Edwards
Tuesday various conferences: Mike Patrick, Len Elmore
Wednesday ACC: Mike Patrick, Dick Vitale or Len Elmore or Jay Bilas, Heather Cox
Wednesday Big East: John Saunders, Fran Fraschilla, Allen Hopkins
Wednesday Big 12: Ron Franklin, Bill Raftery or Fran Fraschilla or Hubert Davis or Stephen Bardo
Wednesday WAC: TBD
Thursday Big East: Dave Pasch, Doris Burke, Allen Hopkins
Thursday Big Ten: Dave O’Brien or Terry Gannon, Steve Lavin or Stephen Bardo
Thursday West Coast: Terry Gannon, Stephen Bardo
Thursday SEC: Brad Nessler or Rece Davis, Jimmy Dykes or Hubert Davis
Saturday Big East: Dave Pasch, Doris Burke
Saturday Big Ten: Dave O’Brien, Steve Lavin
Saturday Big 12: Ron Franklin, Fran Fraschilla
Saturday Atlantic 10: Bob Wischusen, Tim Welsh
Saturday ACC: Mike Patrick, Len Elmore
Saturday SEC: Brad Nessler, Jimmy Dykes

Our two home ESPN games are Thursdays (Michigan and Indiana) so we should get Dave O’Brien or Terry Gannon, Steve Lavin or Stephen Bardo .


#2

Steve Lavin is growing on me. I think he actually likes us, but he seems to call games that go well for us as of late so I’ll take it.

You have a lucky rabbit foot? Nope, I’ve got Steve Lavin


#3

Same here. I talked to him for an extended amount of time 2 years ago and he seemed like a great guy. Brent Musberger, on the other hand…


#4
[quote="NGameday, post:2, topic:110"]Steve Lavin is growing on me.[/quote] Same here. I talked to him for an extended amount of time 2 years ago and he seemed like a great guy. Brent Musberger, on the other hand...

Some years ago, when Musberger was at CBS, that network had two 800 lb. gorillas, with egos to match, him and Dan Rather. Musberger was doing lotf of the big sports CBS was getting. He might’ve even done NFL football, but I don’t remember. I think he got too big for his britches, as they say, and they dumped him. He seems to be a bit more humble since. In the end, it looks like he outlasted Rather.


#5
[quote="NGameday, post:2, topic:110"]Steve Lavin is growing on me.[/quote] Same here. I talked to him for an extended amount of time 2 years ago and he seemed like a great guy. Brent Musberger, on the other hand...

Some years ago, when Musberger was at CBS, that network had two 800 lb. gorillas, with egos to match, him and Dan Rather. Musberger was doing lotf of the big sports CBS was getting. He might’ve even done NFL football, but I don’t remember. I think he got too big for his britches, as they say, and they dumped him. He seems to be a bit more humble since. In the end, it looks like he outlasted Rather.

Musberger was the host of the NFL Today, which was the big ratings winner in part because CBS had the bigger city NFC. He opened with the famous “You are looking LIVE at Veteran’s Stadium, Philadelphia, where …”

He was pretty good at it, but I agree, his on-air persona is much more humble now. The thing that cracks me up is the way he forces a “story line” into every game. Watch him next time he has a game and at some point I will guarantee that he tries to forge some kind of narrative theme out of the action.


#6
[quote="NGameday, post:2, topic:110"]Steve Lavin is growing on me.[/quote] Same here. I talked to him for an extended amount of time 2 years ago and he seemed like a great guy. Brent Musberger, on the other hand...

Some years ago, when Musberger was at CBS, that network had two 800 lb. gorillas, with egos to match, him and Dan Rather. Musberger was doing lotf of the big sports CBS was getting. He might’ve even done NFL football, but I don’t remember. I think he got too big for his britches, as they say, and they dumped him. He seems to be a bit more humble since. In the end, it looks like he outlasted Rather.

Musberger was the host of the NFL Today, which was the big ratings winner in part because CBS had the bigger city NFC. He opened with the famous “You are looking LIVE at Veteran’s Stadium, Philadelphia, where …”

He was pretty good at it, but I agree, his on-air persona is much more humble now. The thing that cracks me up is the way he forces a “story line” into every game. Watch him next time he has a game and at some point I will guarantee that he tries to forge some kind of narrative theme out of the action.

TOTALLY agree tjb! But that is exactly why he has made MILLIONS in a very competitive field. He is the best at “Framing the Story.” That is, forcing the viewers to accept the story that his bosses tell him to force! But, what do I know, I am the resident network conspiracy nut.
Just like Archie Bunker used to say…"I am against all the right things."
Musberger is one of the reasons I love the “mute” button.


#7
[quote="NGameday, post:2, topic:110"]Steve Lavin is growing on me.[/quote] Same here. I talked to him for an extended amount of time 2 years ago and he seemed like a great guy. Brent Musberger, on the other hand...

Some years ago, when Musberger was at CBS, that network had two 800 lb. gorillas, with egos to match, him and Dan Rather. Musberger was doing lotf of the big sports CBS was getting. He might’ve even done NFL football, but I don’t remember. I think he got too big for his britches, as they say, and they dumped him. He seems to be a bit more humble since. In the end, it looks like he outlasted Rather.

Musberger was the host of the NFL Today, which was the big ratings winner in part because CBS had the bigger city NFC. He opened with the famous “You are looking LIVE at Veteran’s Stadium, Philadelphia, where …”

He was pretty good at it, but I agree, his on-air persona is much more humble now. The thing that cracks me up is the way he forces a “story line” into every game. Watch him next time he has a game and at some point I will guarantee that he tries to forge some kind of narrative theme out of the action.

TOTALLY agree tjb! But that is exactly why he has made MILLIONS in a very competitive field. He is the best at “Framing the Story.” That is, forcing the viewers to accept the story that his bosses tell him to force! But, what do I know, I am the resident network conspiracy nut.
Just like Archie Bunker used to say…"I am against all the right things."
Musberger is one of the reasons I love the “mute” button.

Had a conversation the other day with a friend about how bad the baseball TV announcers are. It was much better when there were characters, like in NY, Mel Allen and Red Barber. St. Louis, then Chicago had Harry Caray, Ernie Harwell at Detroit. Though I didn’t hear him much, the Philly announcer, Harry Kalas also up there. Today, IMO, Vin Scully is awesome. He’s been doing Dodger games since 1949, and is always well prepared. Joe Morgan pretty solid, but not so much a character. So many announcers, like Musberger, Bob Costas, etc, are not experts at anything, but move among sports, doing none of them well. I guess the networks try to maximize them, but having a specialist, like John Madden, much better, IMO. Here’s Kalas calling the last out of the '08 World Series, with his sidekick.

Tim, dead right about Musberger framing stories. They seem contrived.

Here’s Scully doing the Gibson walk off in game 1 of the ‘89 WS with Joe Garagiola, vs. a heavily favored A’s team, with a pre-steroid Mark McGwire at 1st. I’ve heard Jack Buck do this same play on a Bud commercial, so he must’ve been doing the radio coverage. Scully does it so understated, and let’s the moment speak for itself. Real class. Just the way he introduces Kirk Gibson by only saying, "and look who’s comin’ up." If anyone desires to be an announcer, get the baseball package, and listen to Scully. He must read the media guide for the opponent, and the 1st time through the lineup, he gives the Dodger fans all this info about the opponents. I remember one time he said about David Dellucci, “one thing his teammates say they like about him, is he believes wrestling is real. Okay, Dave.”

harry kalas and wheeler

Kirk Gibson Walk Off


#8

That’s correct. Buck’s famous “I don’t believe…” call came from the radio broadcast.


#9

One of my all time favorite booth duos was Jack Buck & Hank Stram when they did the MNF radio broadcasts. Those two were as big a part of my sports life as Harry & Whitey.


#10

Even though he annoyed a lot of people, one of my all time favorites was Phil Rizzuto. Then again I liked Myron Cope, too.

I never realized how much I would miss Harry Kalas. My parents used to put Phillies games on the radio to settle me when I was a baby. Since I was born in Feb I was about a month old when I started listening to him. Just not the same this year.


#11

I heard them a few times. Good together. Stram had that high pitched, quick, almost staccato voice. Went well with Buck. That KC team Stram coached was one of the most fun to watch of my childhood, Buck Buchanan, Willie Lanier, Fred “the Hammer” Williamson, then the offense, wow, too many to name, but IMO, Mike Garrett and Otis Taylor were fabulous. Then they had Warren McVea, and a guy they called the “flea” or the “gnat”, a tiny punt/kickoff returner (Noland Smith?) One of the most sophisticated offenses ever. Then they got Jan Stenerud, who kicked it so far on kickoffs, they moved it from the 40 to the 35 yard line. Stram was some coach. Crushed by the Packers in Super Bowl I, won it 3 years later, and following the Jets win in the prior year, forced the merger with the NFL. Merger probably doesn’t happen til later, if ever, if the Chiefs don’t win that game.


#12

[quote=“laoDan, post:10, topic:110”]Even though he annoyed a lot of people, one of my all time favorites was Phil Rizzuto. Then again I liked Myron Cope, too.

I never realized how much I would miss Harry Kalas. My parents used to put Phillies games on the radio to settle me when I was a baby. Since I was born in Feb I was about a month old when I started listening to him. Just not the same this year.[/quote]

Myron Cope was good. I hated Rizzuto. He would forget he was announcing to listeners on radio. And those stories about eating pasta at his cousin’s or friends. I couldn’t take it. I heard him do a game one time, and there was a play, a hit, where he never told you what happened, something like this. Remember this was radio:

“A hit to left, he’s gonna try to make it to 3rd, here’s the throw, oh they’re gonna get him, oh, he slides, oh White(Bill White) can you believe that, holy cow, I can’t believe it, holy cow. Can you believe that White?” I was yelling at the radio to find out what happened.

I mean, to be a good announcer, you have to tell listeners what happened. IMO, he failed on this all the time, always leaving you in the dark. And he never told you the score. Red Barber had a 3 minute sand hourglass, and he gave you the score each time it ran out, probably 3 or 4 times per half inning.


#13

Steve Jones changed my life and shaped my childhood


#14

I love Steve Jones’ play by play work but could he please ask an interview question that starts with something other than "How much . . . "?


#15

I grew with Bob Prince and the Pirates! Prince would give the score very often also. He explained that the network told him there was a large amount of new listeners every minute.
Prince was the classic “story teller.” He often explained what it was like doing radio in the “old days” when the announcers were not at the game but home in Pgh. reading game updates via ticker tape. The listeners did not know this. Prince would explain that the announcers would just “make up” most of the stuff they reported (type of pitch and pitch locations etc etc.) When the “ticker tape” would stop for period of time the announcer would make up umpire/manager argument or something to kill time until the tape started again.


#16

The Bridge

Two balls and a strike.

You know what they had on TV today, White?

Bridge on the River Kwai.

Everyone should have gotten an Academy Award for that movie.

I don’t know how many times I’ve seen it.

About forty times.

Alec Guinness!

William Holden!

Three and one the count.

I just heard somebody whistle.

You know that song?

That’s what they whistle.

Nobody out.

And he pops it up.

May 5, 1987
NY at Chicago
Joe Niekro pitching to Carlton Fisk.

From “O Holy Cow! The Selected Verse of Phil Rizzuto,” a book of 84 “found poems” transcribed from Rizzuto’s play-by-play.


#17

[quote=“tjb, post:16, topic:110”]The Bridge

Two balls and a strike.

You know what they had on TV today, White?

Bridge on the River Kwai.

Everyone should have gotten an Academy Award for that movie.

I don’t know how many times I’ve seen it.

About forty times.

Alec Guinness!

William Holden!

Three and one the count.

I just heard somebody whistle.

You know that song?

That’s what they whistle.

Nobody out.

And he pops it up.

May 5, 1987
NY at Chicago
Joe Niekro pitching to Carlton Fisk.

From “O Holy Cow! The Selected Verse of Phil Rizzuto,” a book of 84 “found poems” transcribed from Rizzuto’s play-by-play.[/quote]

He did this all the time. It was like he forgot there was a game on. Somebody like Vin Scully gives you info which intensifies the current situation, not takes you away from it. Scully will say something like,

“and that loads the bases for Ryan Howard, and oh boy, that’s asking for trouble. Ryan is batting .352 in his career with the bases loaded, with 9 home runs. In his last at bat with the bases loaded, two weeks ago vs. the Cardinals, he homered. And he’s 4-11 vs. Clay Kershaw in his career with 2 home runs. Buckle your seat belts for this battle.”

He creates suspense, makes the ordinary extraordinary by knowing the stats. Rizzuto drifted to some unrelated topic. But then, Scully does his homework, Rizzuto didn’t, so he’d tell stories. And for some crazy reason, despite working with Bill White for what must’ve been 10 years, he always called him by his last name. Almost adversarial, I thought.


#18

Kid, there is just no poetry in your heart. But that’s OK – it takes all kinds.


#19

In the early years of cable I watched a lot of Met games. WOR , I think. Ralph Kiner was a hoot. I keep a newspaper article of some Kinerisms.

  • The reason the Mets have played so well at Shea Stadium this season is that they have the best home record in baseball.
  • And on this fathers Day, we wish you all a “Happy Birthday.”
  • We’ll be back with Met’s baseball right after this season is over.
  • Todd Hundley walked intensely his last time up.
    -David Cone is the “pitcher of the year for month of July.”
  • We’ll be back after this word from Manufactor’s Hangover.
    -“That’s the great thing about baseball, you never know what exactly is going on.”

#20

[quote=“tundra, post:19, topic:110”]In the early years of cable I watched a lot of Met games. WOR , I think. Ralph Kiner was a hoot. I keep a newspaper article of some Kinerisms.

  • The reason the Mets have played so well at Shea Stadium this season is that they have the best home record in baseball.
  • And on this fathers Day, we wish you all a “Happy Birthday.”
  • We’ll be back with Met’s baseball right after this season is over.
  • Todd Hundley walked intensely his last time up.
    -David Cone is the “pitcher of the year for month of July.”
  • We’ll be back after this word from Manufactor’s Hangover.
    -“That’s the great thing about baseball, you never know what exactly is going on.”[/quote]

My brother was once assigned to do a video about Mike Schmidt’s 500th homer by Major League Baseball. Schmidt was his ever charming self and refused to cooperate in what was essentially a paean to his skills. Because my brother had put together a Kinerisms highlight tape a year before for Von Hayes (for some reason Von loved Kinerisms), Von intervened to get Schmidt to participate.

The reason Philadelphia never embraced Schmidt was that most fans had to intuitive sense that he was unembraceable.

Wow is this topic veering :wink: