PennStateHoops.com Discussion Forum

Dwyane Wade eyes Olympic pay


#1

So much for playing for national pride…


Dwyane Wade eyes Olympic pay

"It's a lot of things you do for the Olympics -- a lot of jerseys you sell," Wade said after the Heat's practice on Wednesday in advance of Thursday's game against Chicago. "We play the whole summer. I do think guys should be compensated. Just like I think college players should be compensated as well. Unfortunately, it's not there. But I think it should be something, you know, there for it."....

…“You talk about the patriotism that guys should want to play for, but you (need to) find a way to entice the guys,” (Ray) Allen was quoted as saying in the interview. “It’s not the easiest thing in the world if you play deep in the playoffs and then you get two, three weeks off and then you start training again to play more basketball, where it requires you to be away from home and in another country. It’s fun, but your body does need a break.”


#2

[quote=“Skeeza, post:1, topic:3243”]So much for playing for national pride…


Dwyane Wade eyes Olympic pay

[quote=Dwyane Wade eyes Olympic pay]
“It’s a lot of things you do for the Olympics – a lot of jerseys you sell,” Wade said after the Heat’s practice on Wednesday in advance of Thursday’s game against Chicago. “We play the whole summer. I do think guys should be compensated. Just like I think college players should be compensated as well. Unfortunately, it’s not there. But I think it should be something, you know, there for it.”…

…“You talk about the patriotism that guys should want to play for, but you (need to) find a way to entice the guys,” (Ray) Allen was quoted as saying in the interview. “It’s not the easiest thing in the world if you play deep in the playoffs and then you get two, three weeks off and then you start training again to play more basketball, where it requires you to be away from home and in another country. It’s fun, but your body does need a break.”
[/quote][/quote]

Wade should understand that most people couldn’t care less about the United States winning a gold medal in basketball. Send the college players again, it would be more interesting to follow.


#3

Dwayne = you do get paid for playing in the Olympics by your individual sponsors just like every other high profile Olympic athlete like Michael Phelps. Stop being greedy. Don’t want to play - don’t play!!.

I can’t imagine a more incredible moment in a persons life (outside of having children) than walking in the Olympic opening ceremonies wearing your Nations uniform.

These guys just drive me crazy.


#4

I don’t have a problem with anything he’s saying. It’s not like this is some charity event, these guys give up their off-season (which is like you or me giving up all our vacation time at our jobs) to be thrown into a high-expectation, low-reward type of situation, that will negatively effect his real job the following season in all likelihood due to fatigue.

I’m not saying a gold medal isn’t rewarding, but anything less than gold for these guys is considered an absolute failure and I still don’t think most Americans want to admit just how good (some of) the rest of the world is at this sport nowadays.

He’s just saying what everybody is thinking, let’s not get all sensitive about the fact that professional athletes want paid to perform.


#5

But again - they do get paid, and \very well, by their corporate sponsors for playing in the games.


#6

All of them? I’m not familiar with how these sponsorships work that you’re talking about. Something different from deals they already get outside the Olympics or there is some deal in place for Olympic athletes in particular?


#7
[quote="billtown, post:5, topic:3243"]But again - they do get paid, and \very well, by their corporate sponsors for playing in the games.[/quote]

All of them? I’m not familiar with how these sponsorships work that you’re talking about. Something different from deals they already get outside the Olympics or there is some deal in place for Olympic athletes in particular?

Most of their endorsement deals will have bonus clauses for appearing in the Olympics.


#8
[quote="billtown, post:5, topic:3243"]But again - they do get paid, and \very well, by their corporate sponsors for playing in the games.[/quote]

All of them? I’m not familiar with how these sponsorships work that you’re talking about. Something different from deals they already get outside the Olympics or there is some deal in place for Olympic athletes in particular?

Most of their endorsement deals will have bonus clauses for appearing in the Olympics.

That’s true. But these aren’t part of a separate deal that the National Team coordinates for every player then, which I think makes billtown’s statement a little misleading.

I don’t think Wade’s play last Olympics was indicative of a guy who was out there playing selfishly. In fact, I thought he was the most important player on that team for his unselfish play and all-out effort on defense. So if I’m going to give anybody some leeway here it’s him. I’d like to better understand just what the situation is like for most of these guys.

(he’s also part of the infamous big 3, which is probably costing him a bit of money as well contractually… so I just struggle to see him saying something like this out of pure selfishness or greed)


#9

[quote=“Craftsy21, post:4, topic:3243”]I don’t have a problem with anything he’s saying. It’s not like this is some charity event, these guys give up their off-season (which is like you or me giving up all our vacation time at our jobs) to be thrown into a high-expectation, low-reward type of situation, that will negatively effect his real job the following season in all likelihood due to fatigue.

I’m not saying a gold medal isn’t rewarding, but anything less than gold for these guys is considered an absolute failure and I still don’t think most Americans want to admit just how good (some of) the rest of the world is at this sport nowadays.

He’s just saying what everybody is thinking, let’s not get all sensitive about the fact that professional athletes want paid to perform.[/quote]

Yes, kinda like 90% of the rest of the Olympic team. :-\


#10

I find myself rooting against the USA BBall team on most occasions because of comments like that. If you don’t want to play for your country, then don’t volunteer to play. Nobody is forcing him to play. That is the most absurd statement I have ever heard. The international exposure alone by playing on the USA BBall team is worth millions in international endorsement deals.


#11
[quote="Craftsy21, post:4, topic:3243"]I don't have a problem with anything he's saying. It's not like this is some charity event, [b]these guys give up their off-season (which is like you or me giving up all our vacation time at our jobs) to be thrown into a high-expectation, low-reward type of situation,[/b] that will negatively effect his real job the following season in all likelihood due to fatigue.

I’m not saying a gold medal isn’t rewarding, but anything less than gold for these guys is considered an absolute failure and I still don’t think most Americans want to admit just how good (some of) the rest of the world is at this sport nowadays.

He’s just saying what everybody is thinking, let’s not get all sensitive about the fact that professional athletes want paid to perform.[/quote]

Yes, kinda like 90% of the rest of the Olympic team. :-</blockquote>

Say what? Professional sports with large followings don’t consider the Olympics the pinnacle of what they do. A swimmer lives for the Olympics because that’s how they end up making real cash and fame. A basketball player dreams of making the NBA and winning a title there, because that’s where the primary fame and cash is for them.

You think 90% of the olympic athletes are more like basketball players than swimmers? I’d say the vast majority of Olympic sports are things most people only care about during the olympics, so I fail to see how it’s the same thing.


#12

Uh, I doubt that last line is the case for most players. Proof?


#13
[quote="Craftsy21, post:4, topic:3243"]I don't have a problem with anything he's saying. It's not like this is some charity event, [b]these guys give up their off-season (which is like you or me giving up all our vacation time at our jobs) to be thrown into a high-expectation, low-reward type of situation,[/b] that will negatively effect his real job the following season in all likelihood due to fatigue.

I’m not saying a gold medal isn’t rewarding, but anything less than gold for these guys is considered an absolute failure and I still don’t think most Americans want to admit just how good (some of) the rest of the world is at this sport nowadays.

He’s just saying what everybody is thinking, let’s not get all sensitive about the fact that professional athletes want paid to perform.[/quote]

Yes, kinda like 90% of the rest of the Olympic team. :-</blockquote>

Say what? Professional sports with large followings don’t consider the Olympics the pinnacle of what they do. A swimmer lives for the Olympics because that’s how they end up making real cash and fame. A basketball player dreams of making the NBA and winning a title there, because that’s where the primary fame and cash is for them.

You think 90% of the olympic athletes are more like basketball players than swimmers? I’d say the vast majority of Olympic sports are things most people only care about during the olympics, so I fail to see how it’s the same thing.

No, I mean that 90% of the athletes there have no real dream of striking it rich. Their aspirations of reaching the olympics is a huge dedication in time and “vacation” in order to reach their goals, with no million dollar payday or endorsements at the end. The US sent almost 600 athletes. Most did not become millionaires


#14

Ya’ll need to clam down. I’m pretty sure that for Olympic soccer, countries send their junior national teams (<25).

World Cup>Olympic soccer
NBA finals>Olympic basketball

I’d rather see a World Series of Basketball where each country sends their pro champion to play in a super tournament.


#15

And at the same time, most athletes aren’t making much $ for the US Olympic program. The basketball team will probably bring in more $ from jersey sales than the rest of the athletes combined this summer. If you sent a college team over there, no way do they generate the same amount of $. So at the end of the day, the USOC is certainly making out on having these hoops stars playing.

And no, I don’t think that they should be paid. However I can see where the argument comes from (and it’s the same as my thoughts on paying college athletes, I don’t think they should be paid but I can certainly understand how a football player could think that they aren’t being fairly compensated).


#16

Women’s soccer sends the full national teams. In men’s soccer, it’s an under-23 team with 3 allowances for players over age 23. However, those over age 23 need to get permission from their professional team, and teams will rarely a superstar to play. Many countries don’t put much emphasis at all on the Olympics, and they not only take a back seat to the World Cup, but also to continental championships (Euro, Copa America, etc). One of the reasons the US men weren’t able to qualify for the Olympics was the fact that most of their top under-23 players are playing professionally, and the clubs weren’t obligated to release players for Olympic qualifiers. So, we ended up with a shorthanded squad that got upset.


#17

My point exactly. European and Latin American footballers don’t care about the Olympics, and their country’s don’t care either. I don’t see much difference with basketball here.


#18

If Wade wants to get paid, maybe he can sell his bronze medal from 2004.


#19

:slight_smile:


#20

Ha, that’s funny. Maybe they should only get paid for winning gold. Anything less, they get nothing. >:(

I don’t think anyone should get paid for the Olympics. If these guys don’t want to play, then send the next guy. I don’t care about gold. I care about the idea of competing for your country. If the players start getting paid, then they are doing it for the money and not their country. That’s not what the Olympics are about.