PennStateHoops.com Discussion Forum

BTN launches BTN2Go


#1

It’s a shame they’re not including Android users.

http://www.bigtennetwork.com/generic/video/BTN2Go


#2

SlingBox + Laptop = BTN2Go :wink:


#3

Gotta be a subscriber, so no cord-cutting yet! But one step closer!


#4

That’s the first thing that came to my mind – one step closer to not needing cable TV.


#5
[quote="tjb, post:3, topic:2574"]Gotta be a subscriber, so no cord-cutting yet! But one step closer![/quote]

That’s the first thing that came to my mind – one step closer to not needing cable TV.

The cable companies are going to have to react. Most people get 50 - 200 cable channels and only watch maybe a dozen. So they wind up paying for a 100 channels they never watch. They’re going to have to let people only pay for channels they want - and that will cause a lot of cable stations to go out of business.


#6
[quote="tjb, post:3, topic:2574"]Gotta be a subscriber, so no cord-cutting yet! But one step closer![/quote]

That’s the first thing that came to my mind – one step closer to not needing cable TV.

The cable companies are going to have to react. Most people get 50 - 200 cable channels and only watch maybe a dozen. So they wind up paying for a 100 channels they never watch. They’re going to have to let people only pay for channels they want - and that will cause a lot of cable stations to go out of business.

Yeah, but they will still find ways to bundle groups of channels together. Comcast might not let you have vs. without having to pay for 5 other comcast owned channels. And Fox will probably want to bundle their groups together. Even if that happens, I can’t imagine it would cost me as much as I pay now.


#7

The main problem I see with a la carte pricing from cable companies is price. Companies are going still have to negotiate deals for content. Because of that I think a la carte pricing will be much higher. Cable companies will still have expenses to meet and profits to make and that money only comes from the customers.


#8
[quote="Great Santini, post:5, topic:2574"]The cable companies are going to have to react. Most people get 50 - 200 cable channels and only watch maybe a dozen. So they wind up paying for a 100 channels they never watch. They're going to have to let people only pay for channels they want - and that will cause a lot of cable stations to go out of business.[/quote] The main problem I see with a la carte pricing from cable companies is price. Companies are going still have to negotiate deals for content. Because of that I think a la carte pricing will be much higher. Cable companies will still have expenses to meet and profits to make and that money only comes from the customers.

And these cable companies are also the internet providers. Comcast was just in the news this week for suspending the accounts of people that had gove over 250gb for 2 months in a row. And the wireless companies (except for Sprint) have already done away with unlimited data plans. The Comcasts, TWs, and Coxs of the world are going to continue to get their money somehow.


#9

The unlimited plans will come back once 4G gets a bigger footprint and the wireless providers can start to promote dumping your traditional home ISP and just use your 4G account.


#10

I think entertainment companies will begin to stream more and more of their content. If I could get Bloomberg, CNBC, ESPN, History Channel/Military Channel, and HBO streamed I’d be happy. I never watch network TV and I only watch a few cable channels. Lots of the time, we don’t turn the TV on for days.

ESPN already streams a lot of stuff; CNBC has a streaming service (was spotty performance, so I cancelled it) and of course I have HBOGO.

If these cable channels start to realize they don’t need the cable companies to make money, things might get really interesting.


#11

Exactly. I’m so frustrated by my ISP situation (the best I can possibly get is 3Mbps,) and I never would have thought 4G would be my answer BEFORE FiOS or even a decent cable modem option came along. This is very specific to my area of course, but I’m more than ready an expanded 4G footprint.


#12

A la carte may happen through direct subscriptions to content creators. I’d pay $10 a month for the BTN and $5 for ESPN, and then rely on iTunes for Mad Men (and whatever is the Mad Men of its era). I’d be done.

Much like digital advertising made reaching the right people more efficient (and killed the newspaper industry, which relies on the “extra” charge to advertisers for all those impressions served to the wrong people), direct digital content will destroy the cable operators, who charge “extra” for bundling.