Big Ten thankful for "degree of DeChellis"


#1

Gasaway’s Thoughts


#2

Is Gassaway saying, despite stinking at everything PSU is pretty good?


#3

I guess that’s a good thing ???

I tend to look at things a little differently. I’ll call it “Battle Tested” for lack of a better term.

I’ve coached this one kid for 4 years now in a variety of sports. I’ve seen his teams win games they should have no business winning based on the sole fact that the ball was in his hands or the ball came his way on the field at the crucial moment of the game. Whenever other coaches come up to me and ask how “this team” shocked “that team”, I’ll just tell them about the “John Smith factor” (not the kids name, just using John Smith to protect an 8 year old). And I’ve seen it play out so many times.

One player in a sport like basketball can make all the difference in the world, especially at crunch time. You can throw all the Pomeroy and Gassaway numbers and logic out the window when #12 has the ball in his hands at the end of the game.

Talor Battle has the IT factor and we as a fan base should just sit back and enjoy the ride.


#4

I just the articles that all that fancy math can get thrown out the window when you play PSU. Its the grit numbers or something like that.


#5

I think the missed FTs plays a big part in these numbers. When PSU is behind, they don’t have to worry about the FTs. However in the last several years, we’ve seen many games where a 10 point lead turned into a close game very quickly.

Of course having guys like Battle/Cornley willing you to wins certainly doesn’t hurt. ;D


#6

Nope (if that were true, Villanova and Kentucky wouldn’t be on the list).

The numbers can turn out the way that they do by winning close but losing big.


#7

You would think Gassaway would have something better to do with his time. I won’t waste any more of MY time reading his crap.


#8

To each his own. I think his stuff is quite entertaining (and enlightening).


#9
[quote="tundra, post:7, topic:384"]You would think Gassaway would have something better to do with his time. I won't waste any more of MY time reading his crap.[/quote]

To each his own. I think his stuff is quite entertaining (and enlightening).

I like it, too. His writing tends to be a good mix of interesting statistics and comedy.


#10
[quote="tundra, post:7, topic:384"]You would think Gassaway would have something better to do with his time. I won't waste any more of MY time reading his crap.[/quote]

To each his own. I think his stuff is quite entertaining (and enlightening).

He’s definitely entertaining because he’s one of the few people who actually took the time to notice the anomaly and track it. It’s as if he treats us like a pet project and he gets a kick out of writing about it.


#11

I LOVE his stuff. I particularly love his focus on ED.

This is the classic eyeballs vs. stats debate that has been running here for years.

ED’s teams win more than they should. This means either that:

  • He is lucky. (And to make the list in three of the four years it has been kept means he is unusually lucky. Like very, very lucky. Someone could probably calculate the odds of appearing three times in the top 11 of 292 possible conference seasons.)

  • His teams do something right that we have not figured out yet how to measure.

To me, the second point is what “eyeballs” means. It means we can see with our eyes what we have not yet figured out how to quantify.

I don’t know how to test this stuff, but it is something that struck me watching the ETSU-Wake Forest game, and has struck me repeatedly since, including last night.

In that Wake Forest game, he put the ball in Tim Smith’s hands for the last possession and Tim, to put it bluntly, kind of messed up. He took an awful shot.

After the game, ED made nary a peep about the play. Nothing. You can imagine a coach with lower self esteem finding some way to say “That isn’t the way we drew it up.”

Last night, in the closing minutes, ED doesn’t panic or call timeouts or do the whole Big 5 coaching routine with the clipboards and everything. He can do that and even if you don’t want to give him that benefit of the doubt, I will stand on Bobby Knight’s coffee table and shout that Coach Kanaskie can do it.

Instead, ED puts his faith in his guys. I saw practices up close so it is not some lazy version of “players’ coach” that means they can get away with anything. I think he works them in practice and has a high standard, but that he lets them play the games for themselves. That stuff about “have fun out there” that he says before the game, he means.

When Talor Battle was o for the first half of his freshman year, ED still believed in him. When DJ was in his funk last year, ED still stuck with him. We all see that it can take some time to earn that trust, but when you’ve got it, you’ve got it.

Somehow that translates to good performance down the stretch and over delivery for the season. And when someone goes down like Geary Claxton did a couple of years ago, the guys respond. That’s the kind of thing we keep seeing.

That’s what I think, anyway. It’s gotta be measurable somehow.


#12

Interesting. I like Gasaway’s stuff, but I think his conclusion that a team is “fortunate” when he identifies them as an outlier in a statistic created by himself, is a little self-indulgent


#13

[quote=“tjb, post:11, topic:384”]I LOVE his stuff. I particularly love his focus on ED.

This is the classic eyeballs vs. stats debate that has been running here for years.

ED’s teams win more than they should. This means either that:

  • He is lucky. (And to make the list in three of the four years it has been kept means he is unusually lucky. Like very, very lucky. Someone could probably calculate the odds of appearing three times in the top 11 of 292 possible conference seasons.)

  • His teams do something right that we have not figured out yet how to measure.

To me, the second point is what “eyeballs” means. It means we can see with our eyes what we have not yet figured out how to quantify.

I don’t know how to test this stuff, but it is something that struck me watching the ETSU-Wake Forest game, and has struck me repeatedly since, including last night.

In that Wake Forest game, he put the ball in Tim Smith’s hands for the last possession and Tim, to put it bluntly, kind of messed up. He took an awful shot.

After the game, ED made nary a peep about the play. Nothing. You can imagine a coach with lower self esteem finding some way to say “That isn’t the way we drew it up.”

Last night, in the closing minutes, ED doesn’t panic or call timeouts or do the whole Big 5 coaching routine with the clipboards and everything. He can do that and even if you don’t want to give him that benefit of the doubt, I will stand on Bobby Knight’s coffee table and shout that Coach Kanaskie can do it.

Instead, ED puts his faith in his guys. I saw practices up close so it is not some lazy version of “players’ coach” that means they can get away with anything. I think he works them in practice and has a high standard, but that he lets them play the games for themselves. That stuff about “have fun out there” that he says before the game, he means.

When Talor Battle was o for the first half of his freshman year, ED still believed in him. When DJ was in his funk last year, ED still stuck with him. We all see that it can take some time to earn that trust, but when you’ve got it, you’ve got it.

Somehow that translates to good performance down the stretch and over delivery for the season. And when someone goes down like Geary Claxton did a couple of years ago, the guys respond. That’s the kind of thing we keep seeing.

That’s what I think, anyway. It’s gotta be measurable somehow.[/quote]

Great post tjb. Its a contrast in most coaches that are more hands on everything.


#14

[quote=“NittanyIllini, post:3, topic:384”]I guess that’s a good thing ???

I tend to look at things a little differently. I’ll call it “Battle Tested” for lack of a better term.

I’ve coached this one kid for 4 years now in a variety of sports. I’ve seen his teams win games they should have no business winning based on the sole fact that the ball was in his hands or the ball came his way on the field at the crucial moment of the game. Whenever other coaches come up to me and ask how “this team” shocked “that team”, I’ll just tell them about the “John Smith factor” (not the kids name, just using John Smith to protect an 8 year old). And I’ve seen it play out so many times.

One player in a sport like basketball can make all the difference in the world, especially at crunch time. You can throw all the Pomeroy and Gassaway numbers and logic out the window when #12 has the ball in his hands at the end of the game.

Talor Battle has the IT factor and we as a fan base should just sit back and enjoy the ride.[/quote]

For the last 2 years I’ve been sitting back and saying “Welcome to the Talor Battle show”. We haven’t seen the likes of this kid in blue and white at least since Joe Crispin and maybe never. It is fun to watch and Monday night was just one more example.


#15

[quote=“tjb, post:11, topic:384”]I LOVE his stuff. I particularly love his focus on ED.

This is the classic eyeballs vs. stats debate that has been running here for years.

ED’s teams win more than they should. This means either that:

  • He is lucky. (And to make the list in three of the four years it has been kept means he is unusually lucky. Like very, very lucky. Someone could probably calculate the odds of appearing three times in the top 11 of 292 possible conference seasons.)

  • His teams do something right that we have not figured out yet how to measure.

To me, the second point is what “eyeballs” means. It means we can see with our eyes what we have not yet figured out how to quantify.

I don’t know how to test this stuff, but it is something that struck me watching the ETSU-Wake Forest game, and has struck me repeatedly since, including last night.

In that Wake Forest game, he put the ball in Tim Smith’s hands for the last possession and Tim, to put it bluntly, kind of messed up. He took an awful shot.

After the game, ED made nary a peep about the play. Nothing. You can imagine a coach with lower self esteem finding some way to say “That isn’t the way we drew it up.”

Last night, in the closing minutes, ED doesn’t panic or call timeouts or do the whole Big 5 coaching routine with the clipboards and everything. He can do that and even if you don’t want to give him that benefit of the doubt, I will stand on Bobby Knight’s coffee table and shout that Coach Kanaskie can do it.

Instead, ED puts his faith in his guys. I saw practices up close so it is not some lazy version of “players’ coach” that means they can get away with anything. I think he works them in practice and has a high standard, but that he lets them play the games for themselves. That stuff about “have fun out there” that he says before the game, he means.

When Talor Battle was o for the first half of his freshman year, ED still believed in him. When DJ was in his funk last year, ED still stuck with him. We all see that it can take some time to earn that trust, but when you’ve got it, you’ve got it.

Somehow that translates to good performance down the stretch and over delivery for the season. And when someone goes down like Geary Claxton did a couple of years ago, the guys respond. That’s the kind of thing we keep seeing.

That’s what I think, anyway. It’s gotta be measurable somehow.[/quote]

Excellent post Timmy. I think what you state about ED combined with a special player like Battle sort of describes the past two seasons of “surprising” success. Numbers can’t measure intangibles, and I really feel this team has a ton of those, whatever they might be. :slight_smile: