B10 network-The Crisis in Mens Basketball


#1

On right now (10:30-11:00 PM Friday night) hosted by Graham Spanier. Just turned it on, so I haven’t seen much yet.


#2

Dennis Felton (former UGa coach) pointing out how the restrictions on coaches and their contact with players is leading to all the third party individuals to step in as advisors and trainers and to have a huge influence, even though they may be paid by agents and others.


#3

Nothing really earth-shattering in the program, but it is interesting to hear the perspective of Felton. He really came across as a very thoughtful and committed guy.


#4

Love Felton, he was high on my list for when a job opened up here. Sorry I missed the program.


#5

Felton’s biggest points were about how as a coach, there are so many regulations on how much contact they can have with players that it really opens the door to outsiders filling the void. As he pointed out, in every other aspect of college life, students can spend as much time as they want pursuing activities outside of the class, yet in sports the regulations block “official” pursuit of these activities. It is obviously naive to think that the players will NOT dedicate as much time as possible to their sport. If the school and coaches cannot fill that void, then the players will go elsewhere to get help. And that brings in the personal trainers, advisors, and others who may not have the best interest of the players at heart, and who are not nearly as well trained to work with the students as the coaches and athletic staff.

As someone who works in the college environment, I was thinking about one of the buzzwords that does admittedly get overused in academics–“student-centered.” In principle, it means that every rule, every regulation, requirement, etc, needs to be judged first from the perspective of how it affects the student. It really seems that the NCAA should revisit some of their regulations with that point of view. It is obvious that many of the regulations that are in place aren’t done with the best interest of the students in mind.


#6

With regard to NCAA-imposed limits on hours of weekly practice time, that rule was created as a direct result of NCAA surveys of student-athletes. The surveys said that they (student-athletes) wanted more time to participate in the regular student lifestyles at their schools.


#7

That’s a fair argument. But in the discussion last night, I think they were talking about lots of other aspects. For example, the lack of official contact over the summer was brought up. Felton brought up the point that during the summers when the athletes have the fewest classroom obligations, the coaches cannot work with the players. This opens the door to all the different camps that may have questionable ethical value. Felton also brought up the point that, while some schools do an admirable job making sure their students graduate, there’s very little work done to help those students find good jobs after they graduate. He felt that this was a big gap in the process. If more former players got good jobs outside of basketball, they could serve as role models for many of the students coming up through the pipeline.


#8
[quote="Evan Ceg, post:6, topic:516"]With regard to NCAA-imposed limits on hours of weekly practice time, that rule was created as a direct result of NCAA surveys of student-athletes. The surveys said that they (student-athletes) wanted more time to participate in the regular student lifestyles at their schools.[/quote]

That’s a fair argument. But in the discussion last night, I think they were talking about lots of other aspects. For example, the lack of official contact over the summer was brought up. Felton brought up the point that during the summers when the athletes have the fewest classroom obligations, the coaches cannot work with the players. This opens the door to all the different camps that may have questionable ethical value. Felton also brought up the point that, while some schools do an admirable job making sure their students graduate, there’s very little work done to help those students find good jobs after they graduate. He felt that this was a big gap in the process. If more former players got good jobs outside of basketball, they could serve as role models for many of the students coming up through the pipeline.

Every rule is going to have unintended side effects. (It’s one of the arguments against government regulation that is valid, but in my opinion does not mean that you should have no regulations).

Without these rules, many coaches would abuse the system. But because of the rules, students don’t get some of the benefits they would from interacting with the good coaches.


#9

Why did they choose Dr. Spanier to host this program? That is my biggest question.


#10
[quote="ronb89, post:1, topic:516"]On right now (10:30-11:00 PM Friday night) hosted by Graham Spanier. Just turned it on, so I haven't seen much yet.[/quote]

Why did they choose Dr. Spanier to host this program? That is my biggest question.

Because it’s a Penn State produced show not a Big Ten Network show.


#11
[quote="ronb89, post:1, topic:516"]On right now (10:30-11:00 PM Friday night) hosted by Graham Spanier. Just turned it on, so I haven't seen much yet.[/quote]

Why did they choose Dr. Spanier to host this program? That is my biggest question.

Graham Likes to be on TV…